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Retrieval-induced facilitation: initially nontested material can benefit from prior testing of related material.
TLDR
Three experiments examined how taking an initial test affects later memory for prose materials not initially tested, showing that testing enhanced recall 24 hr later for the initially nontested material.
Recalling a Witnessed Event Increases Eyewitness Suggestibility
TLDR
It is shown that real-life eyewitness memory may be even more susceptible to misinformation than is currently envisioned, and that immediate cued recall actually exacerbates the later misinformation effect for both younger and older adults.
The testing effect in recognition memory: a dual process account.
TLDR
Initial testing was shown to enhance later recollection but leave familiarity unchanged, and this conclusion emerged from three dependent measures: source memory, exclusion performance, and remember/know judgments.
Impairing existing declarative memory in humans by disrupting reconsolidation
TLDR
It is demonstrated that human declarative memory can be selectively rewritten during reconsolidation, and the amnesic effect persists for at least 24 h, cannot be attributed solely to source confusion and is attainable only when relearning targets specific existing memories for impairment.
Long-term effects of testing on the recall of nontested materials
TLDR
The results indicate that the magnitude of retrieval-induced facilitation increases with delay at the beginning but asymptotes afterward, similar to the memorial benefit of testing on the tested material.
Paradoxical effects of testing: retrieval enhances both accurate recall and suggestibility in eyewitnesses.
TLDR
This work tested a dual mechanism account, which suggests that RES occurs because initial testing enhances learning of the later misinformation by reducing proactive interference and causes the reactivated memory trace to be more susceptible to later interference.
Contextual processing in episodic future thought.
TLDR
It is suggested that regions within PCC, PHC, and SOG support the activation of well-known contextual settings that people tend to imagine when thinking about personal events, whether in the past or future.
The effects of frontal lobe functioning and age on veridical and false recall
TLDR
Frontal functioning is not the sole cause of older adults’ heightened susceptibility to false memories, and the untested assumption that young adults have uniformly high frontal functioning was tested.
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