• Publications
  • Influence
Political conservatism as motivated social cognition.
TLDR
The core ideology of conservatism stresses resistance to change and justification of inequality and is motivated by needs that vary situationally and dispositionally to manage uncertainty and threat.
The role of stereotyping in system‐justification and the production of false consciousness
Although the concept of justification has played a significant role in many social psychological theories, its presence in recent examinations of stereotyping has been minimal. We describe and
The end of the end of ideology.
  • J. Jost
  • Psychology
    The American psychologist
  • 1 October 2006
TLDR
Studies reveal that there are indeed meaningful political and psychological differences that covary with ideological self-placement and are useful for understanding the political divide between "red states" and "blue states".
A Decade of System Justification Theory: Accumulated Evidence of Conscious and Unconscious Bolstering of the Status Quo
Most theories in social and political psychology stress self-interest, intergroup conflict, ethnocentrism, homophily, ingroup bias, outgroup antipathy, dominance, and resistance. System justification
Political ideology: its structure, functions, and elective affinities.
TLDR
This review examines recent theory and research concerning the structure, contents, and functions of ideological belief systems and considers the consequences of ideology, especially with respect to attitudes, evaluations, and processes of system justification.
The Secret Lives of Liberals and Conservatives: Personality Profiles, Interaction Styles, and the Things They Leave Behind
Although skeptics continue to doubt that most people are “ideological,” evidence suggests that meaningful left-right differences do exist and that they may be rooted in basic personality
Complementary justice: effects of "poor but happy" and "poor but honest" stereotype exemplars on system justification and implicit activation of the justice motive.
TLDR
Exposure to complementary representations of the poor as happier and more honest than the rich would lead to increased support for the status quo and the Protestant work ethic may moderate the effects of stereotype exposure on explicit system justification.
Exposure to benevolent sexism and complementary gender stereotypes: consequences for specific and diffuse forms of system justification.
TLDR
Results suggest that complementary stereotypes psychologically offset the one-sided advantage of any single group and contribute to an image of society in which everyone benefits through a balanced dispersion of benefits.
Antecedents and Consequences of System-Justifying Ideologies
According to system justification theory, there is a psychological motive to defend and justify the status quo. There are both dispositional antecedents (e.g., need for closure, openness to
Group-based dominance and opposition to equality as independent predictors of self-esteem, ethnocentrism, and social policy attitudes among african americans and european americans
Abstract Adopting a multidimensional approach to the measurement and conceptualization of “social dominance orientation” (Pratto, Sidanius, Stallworth, & Malle, 1994), we argue for the existence of
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