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LONG BONE HISTOLOGY OF THE HADROSAURID DINOSAUR MAIASAURA PEEBLESORUM: GROWTH DYNAMICS AND PHYSIOLOGY BASED ON AN ONTOGENETIC SERIES OF SKELETAL ELEMENTS
TLDR
It is concluded that Maiasaura did not grow at all like living non-avian reptiles, which cannot be considered informative models for most aspects of dinosaurian growth (or physiology, to the extent that growth rates reflect metabolism). Expand
GROWTH IN SMALL DINOSAURS AND PTEROSAURS: THE EVOLUTION OF ARCHOSAURIAN GROWTH STRATEGIES
TLDR
The evolution of life history strategies in dinosaurs and pterosaurs, as they relate to rates of growth and adult body sizes, will be better understood as more complete histological studies place these data into phylogenetic and ontogenetic contexts. Expand
Variation in dinosaur skeletochronology indicators: implications for age assessment and physiology
TLDR
The presence of an external fundamental system at the external surface of the cortex and mature epiphyses indicate that the Hypacrosaurus specimen had reached adulthood and growth had slowed considerably from earlier stages, indicating that descriptions of dinosaur physiology as "intermediate" between the physiology of living reptiles and that of living birds and mammals may or may not be valid. Expand
Nest and egg clutches of the dinosaur Troodon formosus and the evolution of avian reproductive traits
TLDR
Non-avian coelurosaurians possess several primitive features found in crocodilians and several derived features shared with birds (relatively larger and potentially asymmetric eggs, one egg produced per oviduct at a time, loss of egg retention, open nests, brooding). Expand
Torosaurus Marsh, 1891, is Triceratops Marsh, 1889 (Ceratopsidae: Chasmosaurinae): Synonymy Through Ontogeny
TLDR
The ontogenetic analyses reveal that Triceratops and “Torosaurus” actually represent growth stages of a single genus, contributing to an unfolding view of extremely reduced dinosaur diversity just before the end of the Mesozoic Era. Expand
On the origin of high growth rates in archosaurs and their ancient relatives: Complementary histological studies on Triassic archosauriforms and the problem of a “phylogenetic signal” in bone
TLDR
The new data suggest that the possibility of reaching and maintaining very high growth rates through ontogeny could have been a basal characteristic of archosauriforms, and ornithosuchians apparently retained and even enhanced the high growth rate of many basal archosuriforms during most of their ontogenetic trajectories. Expand
40Ar/39Ar age and correlation of the nonmarine Two Medicine Formation (Upper Cretaceous), northwestern Montana, U.S.A.
The age of the nonmarine Two Medicine Formation of northwestern Montana is currently based upon correlations with K–Ar-dated Western Interior ammonite zones. 40Ar/39Ar dating of biotite andExpand
The evolution and function of thyreophoran dinosaur scutes: implications for plate function in stegosaurs
TLDR
It seems more likely, as in other groups of dinosaurs, that the variation of dermal armor form in stegosaurs was primarily linked to species individuation and recognition, perhaps secondarily to inter- and intraspecific display, and rarely to facultative thermoregulation. Expand
Extreme Cranial Ontogeny in the Upper Cretaceous Dinosaur Pachycephalosaurus
TLDR
It is proposed that Dracorex hogwartsia, Stygimoloch spinifer and Pachycephalosaurus wyomingensis are the same taxon and represent an ontogenetic series united by shared morphology and increasing skull length. Expand
EMBRYOS AND EGGS FOR THE CRETACEOUS THEROPOD DINOSAUR TROODON FORMOSUS
TLDR
Elongate and asymmetric eggs of the oospecies Prismatoolithus levis occur regularly in the Upper Cretaceous Two Medicine Formation of western Montana and show several aspects either shared or convergent with some birds, and further demonstrate the close relationship of Troodontidae and Aves. Expand
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