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Nanotechnology
Nanotechnology is the set of technologies that enables the manipulation, study or exploitation of very small (typically less than 100 nanometres) structures and systems. To put this into perspective,Expand
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Mechanism of shear-induced metallization
It is well-known that volumetric compression converts insulators into metals (the Herzfeld-Mott transition). Not so well-known is the fact that finite shear strains have a similar effect. ForExpand
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Designing Superhard Materials
In their Perspective, [ Kaner et al. ][1] describe recent efforts to make a material that matches or exceeds the hardness of diamond. Such a material must contain highly directional, short, andExpand
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Design of hard crystals
Abstract Hardness is measured by indenting, or by scratching, a solid. In general, it is a measure of structural stability which, in turn, is determined by elastic stiffness, plastic resistance,Expand
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Micromechanics of Flow in Solids
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Disclination Loops in Polymers
Similar to the dislocations in polymers caused by chain displacement, disclinations are caused by chain kinking and twisting. Two simple kinds are considered, a twist disclination loop (due to chainExpand
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Osmium diboride, an ultra-incompressible, hard material.
The need for wear- and scratch-resistant materials drives the quest for new superhard materials. In this work, we apply two design parameters to identify ultra-incompressible, superhardExpand
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Shear-induced metallization
Abstract It is well known that compression causes insulators and semiconductors to become metallic when the concentration of the matrix atoms (or of impurity atoms) reaches a critical value given byExpand
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Why Silicon Is Hard
  • J. Gilman
  • Chemistry, Medicine
  • Science
  • 10 September 1993
Compared with pure metals and ionic salts, covalent solids such as silicon are hard and brittle because dislocations do not move in them except at high temperatures. A satisfactory explanation forExpand
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