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Status, distribution, and nesting ecology of Snapping Turtle (Chelydra serpentina) on Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, Canada
Based on current knowledge of the ecology and distribution of Snapping Turtle (Chelydra serpentina), both in eastern Canada and elsewhere, we conclude this species is native to Cape Breton Island.
Distribution, natural history and morphology of the blue-spotted salamanders, Ambystoma laterale and A. tremblayi in Nova Scotia (Curatorial Report #22)
TLDR
The purpose of the present study, 1968-1973, was to obtain a better knowledge of the distribution, abundance, natural history and morphology of the blue-spotted salamanders in Nova Scotia.
Snapping Turtle—Tortue serpentine—turtle mi’ kjikj (snapping; Chelydra serpentina), added to the herpetofauna of Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, Canada
TLDR
Snapping Turtle is added to the native herpetofauna of Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, because additional reports received from the public suggest that the species is native to CapeBreton Island.
Setting Boundaries at Borders: Reconciling Laptop Searches and Privacy
TLDR
The nexus between laptops, a government's search and seizure powers, and a traveler's transit through an international border checkpoint where customs officials have enhanced powers to search travelers and their belongings is examined.
The Chain Dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer (Garman, 1881), New to the Canadian Atlantic Ichthyofauna
The Chain Dogfish, Scyliorhinus retifer , is known from southwestern Georges Bank in the United States but until now there have been no verifiable records of this shark in Canadian waters. We report
Erythrism in Spring Peeper (Pseudacris crucifer) in Maritime Canada
We document three cases of erythrism in Spring Peeper (Pseudacris crucifer) in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. Although the source of erythrism in Maritime P. crucifer remains uncertain, the
Marine Animals Collected During FRB Cruise 104 1972 (Curatorial Report #10)
TLDR
Museum staff were unable to participate in Fisheries Research Board Cruise 104, in July-August 1972, however, Dr. Paul Odense agreed to keep same samples of the invertebrates and fishes that were collected during the cruise, and 47 lots were added to the museum collection.
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