• Publications
  • Influence
Illusion and well-being: a social psychological perspective on mental health.
TLDR
Research suggesting that certain illusions may be adaptive for mental health and well-being is reviewed, examining evidence that a set of interrelated positive illusions—namely, unrealistically positive self-evaluations, exaggerated perceptions of control or mastery, and unrealistic optimism—can serve a wide variety of cognitive, affective, and social functions. Expand
Positive illusions and well-being revisited: separating fact from fiction.
TLDR
The theoretical model of how people's perceptions in these domains are positively biased is reviewed, certain misconceptions in its empirical application are correct, and criticisms made by Colvin and Block are addressed. Expand
Staying fit and staying well: physical fitness as a moderator of life stress.
  • J. D. Brown
  • Medicine
  • Journal of personality and social psychology
  • 1991
TLDR
Testing the stress-buffering effect of fitness with subjective and objective indicators of exercise, fitness, and physical well-being showed the buffering effect; however, only objective fitness levels buffered stress when visits to a health facility were considered. Expand
The thrill of victory, the complexity of defeat: self-esteem and people's emotional reactions to success and failure.
TLDR
2 investigations that found that self-esteem differences of this sort emerge for emotions that directly implicate the self but not for emotions not directly implicating the self, which is relevant for understanding the nature and functions of self- esteem. Expand
Handshaking, gender, personality, and first impressions.
TLDR
The pattern of relations among openness, gender, handshaking, and first impressions suggests that a firm handshake may be an effective form of self-promotion for women, and personality traits, assessed through self-report, can predict specific behaviors assessed by trained observers. Expand
Exercise as a buffer of life stress: a prospective study of adolescent health.
TLDR
It is suggested that exercise may be a valuable resource for combating life stress by showing the ability of exercise to buffer stress-induced deteriorations in physical health as exercise levels increased. Expand
Exercise Maintenance of Persons with Arthritis after Participation in a Class Experience
TLDR
It is indicated that factors associated with exercise behavior in this sample are similar to those in the general population; explanatory factors change over time, and changes ascribed to a trial behavior may influence subsequent decision making. Expand
Self-esteem, mood, and self-evaluation: changes in mood and the way you see you.
TLDR
The authors suggest that the tendency for LSE people to respond to negative moods with self-depreciation contributes to psychological distress. Expand
The cost of good fortune: when positive life events produce negative health consequences.
  • J. D. Brown, K. McGill
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Journal of personality and social psychology
  • 1 December 1989
TLDR
The hypothesis that positive life events have a detrimental effect on health only among people with negative self-views was tested, which derives from an identity disruption model of stress, which holds that an accumulation of life events that are inconsistent with the self-concept leads to physical illness. Expand
Attributions for negative life events and depression: the role of perceived control.
  • J. D. Brown, J. Siegel
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Journal of personality and social psychology
  • 1 February 1988
TLDR
Evidence is found that judgments of control interact with other attributions in predicting depression, and internal and global attributions for negative events attributed to controllable causes were found to be inversely related to increases in depression. Expand
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