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Inherited Sterility in Insects
TLDR
F1 sterile progeny produced in the field enhance the efficacy of released partially sterile males, and improve compatibility with other pest control strategies, and can be used to increase the production of natural enemies, and to study the potential host and geographical ranges of exotic lepidopteran pests. Expand
PARASITOIDS AND PARASITES OF SPODOPTERA FRUGIPERDA (LEPIDOPTERA: NOCTUIDAE) IN THE AMERICAS AND CARIBBEAN BASIN: AN INVENTORY
TLDR
An acugutturid, Noctuidonema guyanense (Remillet & Silvain), is the most important ectoparasitic nematode attacking adults of FAW and other noctuid moths in North America, Caribbean Basin, Central America, and Northern South America. Expand
Impact of Moth Suppression/Eradication Programmes Using the Sterile Insect Technique or Inherited Sterility
TLDR
In future the greatest potential for impact of lepidopteran SIT/IS programmes may be in combating key invasive threats such as the eradication of an outbreak of the painted apple moth in New Zealand. Expand
Radiation Biology and Inherited Sterility in False Codling Moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)
TLDR
Decreased F1 fecundity and fertility, increased F1 mortality during development, and a significant shift in the F1 sex ratio in favor of males was observed when increasing doses of radiation were applied to the P1 males. Expand
Inherited sterility in codling moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae): effect of substerilizing doses of radiation on insect fecundity, fertility, and control.
TLDR
Male and female codling moths, Cydia pomonella, were treated with increasing doses of gamma radiation, and the moths were either inbred or outcrossed with fertile counterparts, shifting the F1 sex ratio shifted in favor of male progeny. Expand
Inherited sterility in Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)
TLDR
Newly emerged male and female adult cactus moths, Cactoblastis cactorum (Berg), were treated with increasing doses of gamma radiation, and the moths were outcrossed to fertile counterparts, and a shift in the F1 sex ratio in favor of males was not observed. Expand
Effect of rearing strategy and gamma radiation on field competitiveness of mass-reared codling moths (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae).
TLDR
The best treatment for improving codling moth male field performance was a combination of rearing through diapause and using a low dose of radiation (150 Gy); the difference in performance when insects were treated with 150 or 250 Gy was greater when males had been reared using standard (nondiapause) rearing protocols, suggesting that diapsause rearing may attenuate some of the negative effects of the higher doses of radiation. Expand
Improvement of the sterile insect technique for codling moth Cydia pomonella (Linnaeus) (Lepidoptera Tortricidae) to facilitate expansion of field application
TLDR
The sterile insect technique (SIT) and its derivative, inherited sterility (IS), are, together with mating disruption and granulosis virus, among the options that offer great potential as cost‐effective additions to available control tactics for integration in area‐wide integrated pest‐management approaches. Expand
Developing a Sterile Insect Release Program for Cactoblastis cactorum (Berg) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae): Effective Overflooding Ratios and Release-Recapture Field Studies
TLDR
Results suggest that an overflooding ratio as low as 5:1 can effectively suppress C. cactorum in field cages and that releasing both genders together is more effective than releasing males only. Expand
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