• Publications
  • Influence
The determinants of parenting: a process model.
  • J. Belsky
  • Psychology
    Child development
  • 1 February 1984
TLDR
A process model of competent parental functioning is offered, based on the assumption that a long-neglected topic of socialization, the determinants of individual differences in parental functioning, is illuminated by research on the etiology of child maltreatment.
Beyond diathesis stress: differential susceptibility to environmental influences.
TLDR
Evidence consistent with the proposition that individuals differ in plasticity is reviewed, and multiple instances in which specific genes function less like "vulnerability factors" and more like "plasticity factors," thereby rendering some individuals more malleable or susceptible than others to both negative and positive environmental influences.
Childhood experience, interpersonal development, and reproductive strategy: and evolutionary theory of socialization.
The concept of "reproductive strategy" drawn from the field of behavioral ecology is applied to the study of childhood experience and interpersonal development in order to develop an evolutionary
Etiology of child maltreatment: a developmental-ecological analysis.
  • J. Belsky
  • Psychology
    Psychological bulletin
  • 1 November 1993
This article applies a developmental-ecological perspective to the question of the etiology of physical child abuse and neglect by organizing the paper around a variety of "contexts of maltreatment."
Differential susceptibility to the environment: An evolutionary–neurodevelopmental theory
TLDR
The differential susceptibility paradigm has far-reaching implications for understanding whether and how much child and adult development responds, for better and for worse, to the gamut of species-typical environmental conditions.
Are there long-term effects of early child care?
TLDR
Although parenting was a stronger and more consistent predictor of children's development than early child-care experience, higher quality care predicted higher vocabulary scores and more exposure to center care predicted more teacher-reported externalizing problems.
Vulnerability genes or plasticity genes?
TLDR
Results considered suggest that putative ‘vulnerability genes’ or ‘risk alleles’ might, at times, be more appropriately conceptualized as ‘plasticity genes‚ because they seem to make individuals more susceptible to environmental influences—for better and for worse.
For Better and For Worse
Evidence that adverse rearing environments exert negative effects particularly on children presumed “vulnerable” for temperamental or genetic reasons may actually reflect something else: heightened
Do effects of early child care extend to age 15 years? Results from the NICHD study of early child care and youth development.
TLDR
Both quality and quantity of child care were linked to adolescent functioning and higher quality care predicted higher cognitive-academic achievement at age 15, with escalating positive effects at higher levels of quality.
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