• Publications
  • Influence
Sex differences in aggression between heterosexual partners: a meta-analytic review.
  • J. Archer
  • Psychology
    Psychological bulletin
  • 1 September 2000
TLDR
The findings partially support previous claims that different methods of measurement produce conflicting results, but there was also evidence that the sample was an important moderator of effect size.
Sex Differences in Aggression in Real-World Settings: A Meta-Analytic Review
Meta-analytic reviews of sex differences in aggression from real-world settings are described. They cover self-reports, observations, peer reports, and teacher reports of overall direct, physical,
Testosterone and human aggression: an evaluation of the challenge hypothesis
  • J. Archer
  • Biology, Psychology
    Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews
  • 31 December 2006
An Integrated Review of Indirect, Relational, and Social Aggression
  • J. Archer, S. Coyne
  • Psychology
    Personality and social psychology review : an…
  • 1 August 2005
TLDR
It is concluded that indirect, relational, and social aggression are much more similar than they are different, and ways in which future research can be facilitated by integrating the three areas under an adaptive framework are suggested.
Does sexual selection explain human sex differences in aggression?
  • J. Archer
  • Psychology, Biology
    The Behavioral and brain sciences
  • 1 August 2009
I argue that the magnitude and nature of sex differences in aggression, their development, causation, and variability, can be better explained by sexual selection than by the alternative biosocial
Intimate Terrorism and Common Couple Violence
This study sought to both replicate and considerably extend the findings of Johnson (1999) that there are two distinct subgroups of physical aggression within relation-ships: intimate terrorism and
The influence of testosterone on human aggression.
  • J. Archer
  • Biology, Psychology
    British journal of psychology
  • 1 February 1991
TLDR
This review assesses studies involving androgens, principally testosterone, and human aggression, and suggests that the outcome of aggressive and competitive encounters can alter testosterone levels, thus confounding interpretation of the correlational evidence.
Cross-Cultural Differences in Physical Aggression Between Partners: A Social-Role Analysis
  • J. Archer
  • Sociology, Psychology
    Personality and social psychology review : an…
  • 1 May 2006
TLDR
An analysis of 52 nations showed that 3 indexes of women%'s victimization were also inversely correlated with gender equality and individualism, and sexist attitudes and relative approval of wife beating were also associated with women%', but general levels of violent crime were not.
Assessment of the Reliability of the Conflict Tactics Scales
This article reports meta-analyses of self-agreement and partners' agreement for physical aggression in relationships, measured by the Conflict Tactics Scales. Evidence from concordance rates was
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