• Publications
  • Influence
Cope's rule and the dynamics of body mass evolution in North American fossil mammals.
TLDR
Body mass estimates for 1534 North American fossil mammal species show that new species are on average 9.1% larger than older species in the same genera, which partially explains the unwavering lower size limit and the gradually expanding mid-sized gap. Expand
The Shifting Balance of Diversity Among Major Marine Animal Groups
  • J. Alroy
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Science
  • 3 September 2010
TLDR
Future assemblies of animals following mass extinction cannot be predicted by analyses of Phanerozoic fossils, and the current global crisis may permanently alter the biosphere’s taxonomic composition by changing the rules of evolution. Expand
GEOGRAPHICAL, ENVIRONMENTAL AND INTRINSIC BIOTIC CONTROLS ON PHANEROZOIC MARINE DIVERSIFICATION
Abstract:  The Paleobiology Database now includes enough data on fossil collections to produce useful time series of geographical and environmental variables in addition to a robust globalExpand
A Multispecies Overkill Simulation of the End-Pleistocene Megafaunal Mass Extinction
  • J. Alroy
  • Environmental Science, Medicine
  • Science
  • 8 June 2001
A computer simulation of North American end-Pleistocene human and large herbivore population dynamics correctly predicts the extinction or survival of 32 out of 41 prey species. Slow human populationExpand
Dynamics of origination and extinction in the marine fossil record
  • J. Alroy
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
  • 12 August 2008
The discipline-wide effort to database the fossil record at the occurrence level has made it possible to estimate marine invertebrate extinction and origination rates with much greater accuracy. TheExpand
New methods for quantifying macroevolutionary patterns and processes
  • J. Alroy
  • Biology
  • Paleobiology
  • 1 September 2000
TLDR
Data are presented showing that even diverse individual fossil collections merely yield a noisy version of the same pattern seen in the overall continental data set, suggesting that environmental perturbations do not have simple effects on the biota. Expand
The fossil record of North American mammals: evidence for a Paleocene evolutionary radiation.
  • J. Alroy
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Systematic biology
  • 1 March 1999
TLDR
Paleofaunal data confirm that there were fewer mammalian species during the latest Cretaceous than during any interval of the Cenozoic, and that a massive diversification took place during the early Paleocene, immediately after a mass extinction. Expand
Constant extinction, constrained diversification, and uncoordinated stasis in North American mammals
TLDR
Tests for niche incumbency show that incumbency is widespread and mediated by the suppression of origination at high diversity levels in all groups, and against Vrba's turnover pulse hypothesis, mammalian diversity seems to be integrated at the highest possible taxonomic level, in opposition to the coordinated stasis concept of static guilds. Expand
FAIR SAMPLING OF TAXONOMIC RICHNESS AND UNBIASED ESTIMATION OF ORIGINATION AND EXTINCTION RATES
Paleobiologists are reaching a consensus that biases in diversity curves, origination rates, and extinction rates need to be removed using statistical estimation methods. Diversity estimates areExpand
Phanerozoic Trends in the Global Diversity of Marine Invertebrates
It has previously been thought that there was a steep Cretaceous and Cenozoic radiation of marine invertebrates. This pattern can be replicated with a new data set of fossil occurrences representingExpand
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