• Publications
  • Influence
Cope's rule and the dynamics of body mass evolution in North American fossil mammals.
Body mass estimates for 1534 North American fossil mammal species show that new species are on average 9.1% larger than older species in the same genera. This within-lineage effect is not a samplingExpand
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GEOGRAPHICAL, ENVIRONMENTAL AND INTRINSIC BIOTIC CONTROLS ON PHANEROZOIC MARINE DIVERSIFICATION
Abstract:  The Paleobiology Database now includes enough data on fossil collections to produce useful time series of geographical and environmental variables in addition to a robust globalExpand
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The Shifting Balance of Diversity Among Major Marine Animal Groups
  • J. Alroy
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Science
  • 3 September 2010
No Guide to the Future Although fossils can provide glimpses of evolution, the accuracy for predictions made on the basis of commonality among geographically and hierarchically distinct taxa isExpand
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A Multispecies Overkill Simulation of the End-Pleistocene Megafaunal Mass Extinction
  • J. Alroy
  • Environmental Science, Medicine
  • Science
  • 8 June 2001
A computer simulation of North American end-Pleistocene human and large herbivore population dynamics correctly predicts the extinction or survival of 32 out of 41 prey species. Slow human populationExpand
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The fossil record of North American mammals: evidence for a Paleocene evolutionary radiation.
  • J. Alroy
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Systematic biology
  • 1 March 1999
Paleontologists long have argued that the most important evolutionary radiation of mammals occurred during the early Cenozoic, if not that all eutherians originated from a single commonExpand
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New methods for quantifying macroevolutionary patterns and processes
Abstract This paper documents a series of methodological innovations that are relevant to macroevolutionary studies. The new methods are applied to updated faunal and body mass data sets for NorthExpand
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Constant extinction, constrained diversification, and uncoordinated stasis in North American mammals
Abstract The coordinated stasis model has far-reaching implications. Among them are three important predictions concerning diversity dynamics that I test here against the Cenozoic fossil record ofExpand
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Dynamics of origination and extinction in the marine fossil record
  • J. Alroy
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
  • 12 August 2008
The discipline-wide effort to database the fossil record at the occurrence level has made it possible to estimate marine invertebrate extinction and origination rates with much greater accuracy. TheExpand
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Phanerozoic Trends in the Global Diversity of Marine Invertebrates
It has previously been thought that there was a steep Cretaceous and Cenozoic radiation of marine invertebrates. This pattern can be replicated with a new data set of fossil occurrences representingExpand
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