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How Birds Combat Ectoparasites
TLDR
The evidence - or lack thereof - for many of the purported mechanisms birds have for dealing with ectoparasites are reviewed, focusing on features of the plumage and its components, as well as anti-parasite behaviors. Expand
Epigenetics and the Evolution of Darwin’s Finches
TLDR
The number, chromosomal locations, regional clustering, and lack of overlap of epimutations and genetic mutations suggest that epigenetic changes are distinct and that they correlate with the evolutionary history of Darwin’s finches. Expand
Experimental Demonstration of the Fitness Consequences of an Introduced Parasite of Darwin's Finches
TLDR
The results confirm that P. downsi has significant negative effects on the fitness of medium ground finches, and they may pose a serious threat to other species of Darwin's finches. Expand
Galápagos mockingbirds tolerate introduced parasites that affect Darwin's finches.
TLDR
The results of this study suggest that finches are negatively affected by P. downsi because they do not have such behavioral mechanisms for energy compensation, and mockingbirds are capable of compensation, making them tolerant hosts, and a possible indirect threat to Darwin's finches. Expand
Epigenetic variation between urban and rural populations of Darwin’s finches
TLDR
This study explored variation between populations of Darwin’s finches, which comprise one of the best-studied examples of adaptive radiation, and found dramatic epigenetic differences between the urban and rural populations of both species. Expand
Experimental demonstration of a parasite-induced immune response in wild birds: Darwin's finches and introduced nest flies
TLDR
The relationship between host immune response, parasite load, and host fitness using Darwin's finches and an invasive nest parasite is investigated and it is found that while the immune response of mothers appeared defensive, it did not rescue current reproductive fitness. Expand
Dry year does not reduce invasive parasitic fly prevalence or abundance in Darwin's finch nests
TLDR
This work is distributed under the terms of the License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/. Expand
Galápagos mockingbirds tolerate introduced parasites that affect Darwin's finches.
TLDR
The results of this study suggest that finches are negatively affected by P. downsi because they do not have such behavioral mechanisms for energy compensation, and mockingbirds are capable of compensation, making them tolerant hosts, and a possible indirect threat to Darwin's finches. Expand
Population structure of a vector‐borne plant parasite
TLDR
This study studied the role of mating, dispersal and establishment in host race formation of a parasitic plant, and spanned spatial scales to address how interactions with both vectors and hosts influence parasitic plant structure with implications for parasite virulence evolution and speciation. Expand
Ecoimmunity in Darwin's Finches: Invasive Parasites Trigger Acquired Immunity in the Medium Ground Finch (Geospiza fortis)
TLDR
This is the first demonstration, to the authors' knowledge, of parasite-specific antibody responses to multiple classes of parasites in a wild population of birds. Expand
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