J. Stephen Mcdaniel

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OBJECTIVE This study investigated whether cancer patients with and without major depression exhibit immune system abnormalities similar to those reported in medically healthy, depressed subjects without cancer. METHOD The study subjects consisted of patients diagnosed with pancreatic, esophageal, or breast cancer. Other groups consisted of subjects with(More)
This article reviews the challenge of diagnosing depression in patients with cancer. Major depression and depressive symptoms, although commonly encountered in medical populations, are frequently underdiagnosed and undertreated. This is especially true for patients with cancer in whom the diagnosis of major depression is clouded by neurovegetative symptoms(More)
The need to address the role of employment in the psychosocial adjustment of persons with HIV/ AIDS has been consistently recognized in the clinical care and research literature. In this study, 200 volunteer HIV/AIDS patients completed questionnaires assessing medical and vocational histories, quality of life, and psychological functioning. Employed and(More)
We studied outcome and family history in 203 patients with psychotic depression. Patients whose psychotic features were mood-incongruent were significantly younger and had a slightly poorer outcome. Morbid risks for affective disorder and schizophrenia among relatives distinguished these mood-incongruent patients from patients with non-psychotic depression(More)
Medical and neuropsychiatric sequelae of HIV infection present a spectrum of diagnostic and treatment challenges to mental health clinicians. Both HIV and the many opportunistic infections that manifest in patients due to their immunocompromised state also can affect the central nervous system (CNS). Thus, mental health clinicians need to be familiar with(More)
A double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted to assess the relative efficacy and tolerability of fluoxetine and desipramine in depressed, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive women. Although difficulty in the recruitment and retention of participants led to insufficient power to detect differences between treatment groups, results indicated(More)
OBJECTIVE To assess for significant differences in psychological functioning between HIV-infected children and a demographically matched healthy control group and to examine the utility of applying a stress and coping model to children with HIV disease. METHODS Participants included HIV-infected children (ages 6-16) and their caregivers (n = 36) and a(More)
OBJECTIVE To assess for significant differences in psychological functioning between caregivers of HIV-infected children and caregivers of healthy children, and to examine the utility of applying a stress and coping model to caregivers of children with HIV disease. METHODS Participants included caregivers of HIV-infected children (n = 36) and caregivers(More)