Learn More
BACKGROUND Ground-level concentrations of ozone (O3) and fine particulate matter [< or = 2.5 microm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5)] have increased since preindustrial times in urban and rural regions and are associated with cardiovascular and respiratory mortality. OBJECTIVES We estimated the global burden of mortality due to O3 and PM2.5 from(More)
Background concentrations of tropospheric ozone are increasing and are sensitive to methane emissions, yet methane mitigation is currently considered only for climate change. Methane control is shown here to be viable for ozone management. Identified global abatement measures can reduce approximately 10% of anthropogenic methane emissions at a cost-savings,(More)
Methane (CH(4)) contributes to the growing global background concentration of tropospheric ozone (O(3)), an air pollutant associated with premature mortality. Methane and ozone are also important greenhouse gases. Reducing methane emissions therefore decreases surface ozone everywhere while slowing climate warming, but although methane mitigation has been(More)
[1] Changes in emissions of ozone (O 3) precursors affect both air quality and climate. We first examine the sensitivity of surface O 3 concentrations (O 3 srf) and net radiative forcing of climate (RF net) to reductions in emissions of four precursors – nitrogen oxides (NO x), non-methane volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, and methane (CH 4). We(More)
BACKGROUND Tropospheric ozone and black carbon (BC), a component of fine particulate matter (PM ≤ 2.5 µm in aerodynamic diameter; PM(2.5)), are associated with premature mortality and they disrupt global and regional climate. OBJECTIVES We examined the air quality and health benefits of 14 specific emission control measures targeting BC and methane, an(More)
Large-scale changes in ozone precursor emissions affect ozone directly in the short term, and also affect methane, which in turn causes long-term changes in ozone that affect surface ozone air quality. Here we assess the effects of changes in ozone precursor emissions on the long-term change in surface ozone via methane, as a function of the emission(More)
We present a modeling study of the long-range transport of pollution from Europe, showing that European emissions regularly elevate surface ozone by as much as 20 ppbv in summer in northern Africa and the Near East. Eu-ropean emissions cause 50–150 additional violations per year (i.e. above those that would occur without European pollution) of the European(More)
Observations and models demonstrate that ozone and its precursors can be transported between continents and across oceans. We model the influences of 10% reductions in anthropogenic nitrogen oxide (NO x) emissions from each of nine world regions on surface ozone air quality in that region and all other regions. In doing so, we quantify the relative(More)
Actions to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions often reduce co-emitted air pollutants, bringing co-benefits for air quality and human health. Past studies(1-6) typically evaluated near-term and local co-benefits, neglecting the long-range transport of air pollutants(7-9), long-term demographic changes, and the influence of climate change on air(More)
[1] Over the past century, atmospheric methane (CH 4) rose dramatically before leveling off in the late 1990s. The processes controlling this trend are poorly understood, limiting confidence in projections of future CH 4. The MOZART-2 global tropospheric chemistry model qualitatively captures the observed CH 4 trend (increasing in the early 1990s and then(More)