J . - F . Glicenstein

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X-ray binaries are composed of a normal star in orbit around a neutron star or stellar-mass black hole. Radio and x-ray observations have led to the presumption that some x-ray binaries called microquasars behave as scaled-down active galactic nuclei. Microquasars have resolved radio emission that is thought to arise from a relativistic outflow akin to(More)
Gamma-ray line signatures can be expected in the very-high-energy (E(γ)>100 GeV) domain due to self-annihilation or decay of dark matter (DM) particles in space. Such a signal would be readily distinguishable from astrophysical γ-ray sources that in most cases produce continuous spectra that span over several orders of magnitude in energy. Using data(More)
The Vela supernova remnant (SNR) is a complex region containing a number of sources of non-thermal radiation. The inner section of this SNR, within 2 degrees of the pulsar PSR B0833−45, has been observed by the H.E.S.S. γ-ray atmospheric Cherenkov detector in 2004 and 2005. A strong signal is seen from an extended region to the south of the pulsar, within(More)
Aims. We present results from deep observations of the Galactic shell-type supernova remnant (SNR) RX J1713.7−3946 (also known as G347.3−0.5) conducted with the complete H.E.S.S. array in 2004. Methods. Detailed morphological and spatially resolved spectral studies reveal the very-high-energy (VHE – Energies E > 100 GeV) gammaray aspects of this object with(More)
The detection of fast variations of the tera-electron volt (TeV) (10(12) eV) gamma-ray flux, on time scales of days, from the nearby radio galaxy M87 is reported. These variations are about 10 times as fast as those observed in any other wave band and imply a very compact emission region with a dimension similar to the Schwarzschild radius of the central(More)
Aims. We present deep H.E.S.S. observations of the supernova remnant (SNR) RX J1713.7−3946. Combining data of three years – from 2003 to 2005 – we obtain significantly increased statistics and energy coverage as compared to earlier 2003 & 2004 results. Methods. The data are analysed separately for the different years. Results. Very good agreement of the(More)
The source of Galactic cosmic rays (with energies up to 10(15) eV) remains unclear, although it is widely believed that they originate in the shock waves of expanding supernova remnants. At present the best way to investigate their acceleration and propagation is by observing the gamma-rays produced when cosmic rays interact with interstellar gas. Here we(More)
A search for a very-high-energy (VHE; ≥100  GeV) γ-ray signal from self-annihilating particle dark matter (DM) is performed towards a region of projected distance r∼45-150  pc from the Galactic center. The background-subtracted γ-ray spectrum measured with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) γ-ray instrument in the energy range between 300 GeV(More)
The accretion of matter onto a massive black hole is believed to feed the relativistic plasma jets found in many active galactic nuclei (AGN). Although some AGN accelerate particles to energies exceeding 10(12) electron volts and are bright sources of very-high-energy (VHE) gamma-ray emission, it is not yet known where the VHE emission originates. Here we(More)
The serendipitous discovery of an unidentified extended TeV γ-ray source close to the galactic plane named HESS J1303-631 at a significance of 21 standard deviations is reported. The observations were performed between February and June 2004 with the H.E.S.S. stereoscopic system of Cherenkov telescopes in Namibia. HESS J1303-631 was discovered roughly 0.6(More)