Jürgen W. Falter

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The enormous Nazi voting literature rarely builds on modern statistical or economic research. By adding these approaches, we find that the most widely accepted existing theories of this era cannot distinguish the Weimar elections from almost any others in any country. Via a retrospective voting account, we show that voters most hurt by the depression, and(More)
How far can the media protect or undermine democratic institutions in unconsolidated democracies, and how persuasive can they be in ensuring public support for dictator's policies? We study this question in the context of Germany between 1929 and 1939. Using geographical and temporal variation in radio availability, we show that radio had a significant(More)
We collect new data on the density of associations in 229 towns and cities in interwar Germany. Towns with one bstandard deviation higher association density – a common proxy for social capital – saw at least 15% faster Nazi Party entry. Not only associations with a militaristic outlook (such as veteran clubs) positively predict Nazi Party entry, but also(More)
We study the connection between religion and political radicalization in Weimar Germany, where the Catholic Church vehemently warned ordinary parishioners about the dangers of National Socialism. We establish that constituencies’ religious composition is the single most important empirical predictor of Nazi vote shares– dwarfing the explanatory power of any(More)
How did free and fair democratic elections lead to the extraordinary anti-democratic Nazi Party winning control of the Weimar Republic? The profound implications of this question have led “Who voted for Hitler?” to be the most studied question in the history of voting behavior research. Yet, despite the overwhelming attention, scholars have treated these(More)
Adolf Hitler’s seizure of power was one of the most consequential events of the twentieth century. Yet, our understanding of which factors fueled the astonishing rise of the Nazis remains highly incomplete. This paper shows that religion played an important role in the Nazi party’s electoral success–dwarfing all available socioeconomic variables. To obtain(More)
How did free and fair democratic elections lead to the extraordinary anti-democratic Nazi Party winning control of the Weimar Republic? The profound implications of this question have led “Who voted for Hitler?” to be the most studied question in the history of voting behavior research. Yet, despite the overwhelming attention, scholars, mostly from history,(More)
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