Jérôme Ganne

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  • J M Ganne
  • The Australian journal of physiotherapy
  • 1988
Methods of electrical stimulation of bone are reviewed for a comparison with the use of interference currents and for a consideration of the possible merits of various methods. A summary is given of results of treatment of 38 patients with delayed or non-union and predisposition to non-union, and the technique used with Interferential Therapy is described(More)
The Neoproterozoic (1000–542 mol.yr ago) witnessed the dawn of Earth as we know it with modern-style plate tectonics, high levels of O2 in atmosphere and oceans and a thriving fauna. Yet, the processes leading to the fully oxygenation of the external envelopes, its exact timing and its link with the inner workings of the planet remain poorly understood. In(More)
  • J M Ganne
  • The Australian journal of physiotherapy
  • 1976
Interferential Therapy is a "new-comer" to the field of physical medicine, but it is gradually acquiring a particular identity. As the name implies, a current is generated within the tissues as a result of the interaction of two separate circuits. It can therefore be appreciated that four electrodes are required, two for each circuit. The two currents(More)
  • J M Ganne
  • The Australian journal of physiotherapy
  • 1972
Those engaged in the clinical rather than the experimental field of medicine are constantly striving to improve their methods of relieving pain, using chemotherapy, surgery or physical therapy according to their particular specialization. This is hardly surprising, since all hospital departments, wards and private clinics are filled with a large proportion(More)
  • J M Ganne
  • The Australian journal of physiotherapy
  • 1968
The first report on the use of the Sinusoidal current in the treatment of pain was given to the Physiotherapy Society of South Australia in February, 1964. Twenty-six patients were treated; they all had post-traumatic pain with well defined local tenderness and/or hypersensitivity, and, in the case of the amputees, some phantom pains and jactitations as(More)
Non-union of mandibular fractures is uncommon, but when it does occur it requires protracted treatment including further surgery. Nine patients with factors known to predispose to non-union out of 150 consecutive mandibular fractures received interferential therapy (I.T.) during the fixation period; all fractures united satisfactorily. In a retrospective(More)
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