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Autotransport in Gram-negative bacteria denotes the ability of surface-localized proteins to cross the outer membrane (OM) autonomously. Autotransporters perform this task with the help of a β-barrel transmembrane domain localized in the OM. Different classes of autotransporters have been investigated in detail in recent years; classical monomeric but also(More)
Genomic neighborhood can provide important insights into evolution and function of a protein or gene. When looking at operons, changes in operon structure and composition can only be revealed by looking at the operon as a whole. To facilitate the analysis of the genomic context of a query in multiple organisms we have developed Genomic Context Viewer(More)
Trimeric autotransporter adhesins (TAAs) are important virulence factors of many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. TAAs form fibrous, adhesive structures on the bacterial cell surface. Their N-terminal extracellular domains are exported through a C-terminal membrane pore; the insertion of the pore domain into the bacterial outer membrane follows the rules(More)
Bacterial type III protein secretion systems inject effector proteins into eukaryotic host cells in order to promote survival and colonization of Gram-negative pathogens and symbionts. Secretion across the bacterial cell envelope and injection into host cells is facilitated by a so-called injectisome. Its small hydrophobic export apparatus components SpaP(More)
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