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The beta-galactosidase from the Antarctic gram-negative bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAE 79 was purified to homogeneity. The nucleotide sequence and the NH(2)-terminal amino acid sequence of the purified enzyme indicate that the beta-galactosidase subunit is composed of 1,038 amino acids with a calculated M(r) of 118,068. This beta-galactosidase(More)
Multiple osteochondromas (MO) is an autosomal dominant skeletal disease characterized by the formation of multiple cartilage-capped bone tumors growing outward from the metaphyses of long tubular bones. MO is genetically heterogeneous, and is associated with mutations in Exostosin-1 (EXT1) or Exostosin-2 (EXT2), both tumor-suppressor genes of the EXT gene(More)
BACKGROUND Mutations in Exostosin-1 (EXT1) or Exostosin-2 (EXT2) cause the autosomal dominant disorder multiple osteochondromas (MO). This disease is mainly characterized by the appearance of multiple cartilage-capped protuberances arising from children's metaphyses and is known to display clinical inter- and intrafamilial variations. EXT1 and EXT2 are both(More)
Multiple osteochondromas (MO) is an autosomal-dominant skeletal disorder characterized by the formation of multiple cartilage-capped protuberances. MO is genetically heterogeneous and is associated with mutations in the EXT1 and EXT2 genes. In this study we describe extensive mutation screening in a set of 63 patients with clinical and radiographical(More)
BACKGROUND Multiple hereditary exostoses is an autosomal dominant skeletal disorder characterized by wide variation in clinical phenotype. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the severity of the disease is linked with a specific genetic background. METHODS Five hundred and twenty-nine patients with multiple hereditary exostoses from two(More)
Multiple osteochondromas (MO) is a hereditary skeletal disorder characterized by the presence of cartilage capped bony outgrowths at bone surface. Causative mutations in EXT1 or EXT2 genes have been described in 85-90 % of MO cases. However, in about 10-15 % of the MO cases, genomic alterations can not be detected, implying the potential role of other(More)
BACKGROUND Osteochondromas (cartilage-capped bone tumors) are by far the most commonly treated of all primary benign bone tumors (50%). In 15% of cases, these tumors occur in the context of a hereditary syndrome called multiple osteochondromas (MO), an autosomal dominant skeletal disorder characterized by the formation of multiple cartilage-capped bone(More)
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