Ivette Landrian

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Spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10), an autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, is caused by the expansion of the non-coding ATTCT pentanucleotide repeat in the ATAXIN 10 gene. To date, all cases of SCA10 are restricted to patients with ancestral ties to Latin American countries. Here, we report on a SCA10 patient with Sioux Native American ancestry and no(More)
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10; OMIM #603516) is an autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia with variably associated extracerebellar signs.(1,2) SCA10 is caused by an expanded noncoding pentanucleotide repeat in ATXN10, which normally ranges from 9 to 32 repeats(3,4); pathogenic alleles have as many as 4,500 repeats.(4) To date, SCA10 has been found(More)
A large, non-coding ATTCT repeat expansion causes the neurodegenerative disorder, spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10). In a subset of SCA10 patients, interruption motifs are present at the 5' end of the expansion and strongly correlate with epileptic seizures. Thus, interruption motifs are a predictor of the epileptic phenotype and are hypothesized to(More)
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by a noncoding ATTCT pentanucleotide expansion. An inverse correlation between SCA10 expansion size and age at onset has been reported, and genetic anticipation has been documented. Interruptions in the ATTCT expansion are known to occur within the expansion.(More)
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10), an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder, is the result of a non-coding, pentanucleotide repeat expansion within intron 9 of the Ataxin 10 gene. SCA10 patients present with pure cerebellar ataxia; yet, some families also have a high incidence of epilepsy. SCA10 expansions containing penta- and heptanucleotide(More)
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10), an autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia disorder, is caused by a non-coding ATTCT microsatellite repeat expansion in the ataxin 10 gene. In a subset of SCA10 families, the 5'-end of the repeat expansion contains a complex sequence of penta- and heptanucleotide interruption motifs which is followed by a pure tract of(More)
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