Isaline Rowe

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Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a common genetic disorder characterized by bilateral renal cyst formation. Recent identification of signaling cascades deregulated in ADPKD has led to the initiation of several clinical trials, but an approved therapy is still lacking. Using a metabolomic approach, we identify a pathogenic pathway in(More)
Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a common genetic disease characterized by bilateral renal cyst formation. Both hyperproliferation and hypertrophy have been previously observed in ADPKD kidneys. Polycystin-1 (PC-1), a large orphan receptor encoded by the PKD1 gene and mutated in 85% of all cases, is able to inhibit proliferation and(More)
Polycystin-1 (PC-1), the product of the PKD1 gene, mutated in the majority of cases of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD), is a very large (approximately 520 kDa) plasma membrane receptor localized in several subcellular compartments including cell-cell/matrix junctions as well as cilia. While heterologous over-expression systems have(More)
Several organs, including the lungs and kidneys, are formed by epithelial tubes whose proper morphogenesis ensures correct function. This is best exemplified by the kidney, where defective establishment or maintenance of tubular diameter results in polycystic kidney disease, a common genetic disorder. Most polycystic kidney disease cases result from(More)
Mutations in PKD1, the gene encoding for the receptor Polycystin-1 (PC-1), cause autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The cytoplasmic C-terminus of PC-1 contains a coiled-coil domain that mediates an interaction with the PKD2 gene product, Polycystin-2 (PC-2). Here we identify a novel domain in the PC-1 C-terminal tail, a polyproline motif(More)
Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is an important cause of ESRD for which there exists no approved therapy in the United States. Defective glucose metabolism has been identified as a feature of ADPKD, and inhibition of glycolysis using glucose analogs ameliorates aggressive PKD in preclinical models. Here, we investigated the effects of(More)
Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a common genetic disorder characterized by bilateral renal cyst formation. The disease is caused by mutations in either the PKD1 or the PKD2 gene. Progress has been made in understanding the molecular basis of the disease leading to the general agreement on ADPKD being a loss-of-function disease.(More)
The PKD1 gene is essential for a number of biological functions, and its loss-of-function causes autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The gene is developmentally regulated and believed to play an essential role in renal development. Previous studies have shown that manipulating murine renal organ cultures with dominant-negative forms of the(More)
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