Iris J. Holzleitner

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Recent studies suggest that judgments of facial masculinity reflect more than sexually dimorphic shape. Here, we investigated whether the perception of masculinity is influenced by facial cues to body height and weight. We used the average differences in three-dimensional face shape of forty men and forty women to compute a morphological masculinity score,(More)
Although widely cited as strong evidence that sexual selection has shaped human facial attractiveness judgments, evidence that preferences for masculine characteristics in men's faces are related to women's hormonal status is equivocal and controversial. Consequently, we conducted the largest ever longitudinal study of women's preferences for facial(More)
Facial appearance has a well-documented effect on perceived leadership ability. Face judgments of leadership ability predict political election outcomes across the world, and similar judgments of business CEOs predict company profits. Body height is also associated with leadership ability, with taller people attaining positions of leadership more than their(More)
Impressions of health are integral to social interactions, yet poorly understood. A review of the literature reveals multiple facial characteristics that potentially act as cues to health judgements. The cues vary in their stability across time: structural shape cues including symmetry and sexual dimorphism alter slowly across the lifespan and have been(More)
Studies on mate preferences have demonstrated that women’s perception of male attractiveness is sensitive to men’s facial masculinity, and that women’s preferences for facial masculinity are subject to individual differences, such as own condition. These individual differences have been linked to potential tradeoffs that women face given the hypothesized(More)
Havlicek et al. (Behavioral Ecology, 26, 1249-1260, 2015) proposed that increased attractiveness of women in hormonal states associated with high fertility is a byproduct (or “perceptual spandrel”) of adaptations related to between-women differences in sex hormones. A critical piece of their argument was the claim that between-women hormone-attractiveness(More)
Women’s affiliative behavior towards kin and responses to facial cues of kinship (self-resemblance) both change as a function of their hormonal status. Such hormone-mediated changes might serve to (1) avoid inbreeding during peak fertility and/or (2) increase kin affiliation during pregnancy. The first hypothesis predicts that responses to kinship cues will(More)
Although widely cited as strong evidence that sexual selection has shaped human facial attractiveness judgments, evidence that preferences for masculine characteristics in men's faces are related to women's hormonal status is equivocal and controversial. Consequently, we conducted the largest ever longitudinal study of women's preferences for facial(More)
The benefits of minimizing the costs of engaging in violent conflict are thought to have shaped adaptations for the rapid assessment of others' capacity to inflict physical harm. Although studies have suggested that men's faces and voices both contain information about their threat potential, one recent study suggested that men's faces are a more valid cue(More)
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