Irene Bertschek

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This paper analyzes the relationship between investment in information and communication technologies (ICT), non–ICT–investment, labor productivity and workplace reorganization. Firms are assumed to reorganize workplaces if the productivity gains arising from workplace reorganization exceed the associated reorganization costs. Two different types of(More)
Although in its infancy, one promising application of Internet technology for firms is so-called Internet commerce or electronic commerce. This paper analyses the determinants of B2B (business-to-business) adoption borrowing from the literature on the adoption of new technologies and considering factors like firm size, corporate status, human capital and(More)
In order to assess the productivity effects of information and communication technologies (ICT), regressions based on cross–sectional firm–level data may yield unreliable results for the commonly employed production function framework. In this paper, various estimation biases and econometric strategies to overcome their sources are discussed. The effects(More)
Using a unique German firm-level data set, we provide empirical evidence for a productivity sorting along two dimensions: international activity and technology choice. We consider domestic and exporting firms and measure technology choice by firms’ actual use of advanced information technology (IT). For manufacturing firms, the observed sorting pattern is(More)
Does online availability boost citations? Using a panel of citations to economics and business journals, we show that the enormous effects found in previous studies were an artifact of their failure to control for article quality, disappearing once fixed effects are added as controls. The absence of aggregate effects masks heterogeneity across platforms:(More)
The paper provides empirical evidence for the causal impact of broadband Internet on the economic performance of German firms. Performance is measured in terms of labour productivity and realised process and product innovations. The analysis refers to the early phase of DSL expansion in Germany from 2001 to 2003, when roughly 60 percent of the German firms(More)
The paper provides empirical evidence for the question whether firms’ ITenabled labour productivity is affected by the age structure of the workforce. We apply a production function approach with heterogenous labour to firmlevel data from German manufacturing and services industries. We find that workers older than 49 are not significantly less productive(More)
  • Alexandra Spitz-Oener, Joshua Angrist, +6 authors Susanne Prantl
  • 2007
The Returns to Pencil Use Revisited The increased diffusion of computers is one of the fundamental changes at workplaces in recent decades. While the majority of workers now spend a substantial fraction of their working day with a computer, research on the wage effect of computer use effectively came to a halt after DiNardo and Pischke [1997] found that(More)
The paper analyses the relationship between labour productivity, the proportion of older employees and IT intensity in firms. Using firm-level data from German manufacturing and services industries, we find that workers older than 49 are not significantly less productive than prime age workers, whereas workers younger than 30 are significantly less(More)
In this paper we analyze the impact of information technology and organizational changes on wages using individual level data for 1998/1999. The average impact of IT use on wages turns out to be five to six percent, however, the effects differ across different IT components. Unless employees use IT at the workplace, they do not share in the gains from(More)