Ionita Calin Ghiran

Learn More
The ulcer-causing gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori is the only bacterium known to colonize the harsh acidic environment of the human stomach. H. pylori survives in acidic conditions by producing urease, which catalyzes hydrolysis of urea to yield ammonia thus elevating the pH of its environment. However, the manner in which H. pylori is able to swim(More)
Mannan-binding lectin (MBL), a member of the collectin family, is known to have opsonic function, although identification of its cellular receptor has been elusive. Complement C1q, which is homologous to MBL, binds to complement receptor 1 (CR1/CD35), and thus we investigated whether CR1 also functions as the MBL receptor. Radioiodinated MBL bound to(More)
This article reports the development of an optical imaging technique, confocal light absorption and scattering spectroscopic (CLASS) microscopy, capable of noninvasively determining the dimensions and other physical properties of single subcellular organelles. CLASS microscopy combines the principles of light-scattering spectroscopy (LSS) with confocal(More)
Microbes as well as immune complexes and other continuously generated inflammatory particles are efficiently removed from the human circulation by red blood cells (RBCs) through a process called immune-adherence clearance. During this process, RBCs use complement receptor 1 (CR1, CD35) to bind circulating complement-opsonized particles and transfer them to(More)
The capacity of airway eosinophils, potentially pertinent to allergic diseases of the upper and lower airways, to function as professional APCs, those specifically able to elicit responses from unprimed, Ag-naive CD4(+) T cells has been uncertain. We investigated whether airway eosinophils are capable of initiating naive T cell responses in vivo.(More)
The primary identified function of complement receptor 1 (CR1/CD35) on primate erythrocytes is to bind complement-tagged inflammatory particles including microbes and immune complexes. When erythrocytes circulate through liver and spleen, sinusoidal phagocytes remove CR1-adherent particles and erythrocytes return to the circulation. This process of immune(More)
CD4(+) T cells are involved in the development of autoimmunity, including multiple sclerosis (MS). Here we show that nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) blocks experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a mouse model of MS, by inducing immune homeostasis through CD4(+)IFNγ(+)IL-10(+) T cells and reverses disease progression by restoring tissue(More)
Eosinophils release their granule proteins extracellularly through exocytosis, piecemeal degranulation, or cytolytic degranulation. Findings in diverse human eosinophilic diseases of intact extracellular eosinophil granules, either free or clustered, indicate that eosinophil cytolysis occurs in vivo, but the mechanisms and consequences of lytic eosinophil(More)
Sickle cell disease affects 25% of people living in Central and West Africa and, if left undiagnosed, can cause life threatening "silent" strokes and lifelong damage. However, ubiquitous testing procedures have yet to be implemented in these areas, necessitating a simple, rapid, and accurate testing platform to diagnose sickle cell disease. Here, we present(More)
The identification of extracellular vesicles (EVs) as intercellular conveyors of biological information has recently emerged as a novel paradigm in signaling, leading to the exploitation of EVs and their contents as biomarkers of various diseases. However, whether there are diurnal variations in the size, number, and tissue of origin of blood EVs is(More)