Inessa Schwab

Learn More
Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) preparations comprise pooled IgG antibodies from the serum of thousands of donors and were initially used as an IgG replacement therapy in immunocompromised patients. Since the discovery, more than 30 years ago, that IVIG therapy can ameliorate immune thrombocytopenia, the use of IVIG preparations has been extended to a(More)
Despite the beneficial therapeutic effects of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) in inflammatory diseases, consistent therapeutic efficacy and potency remain major limitations for patients and physicians using IVIg. These limitations have stimulated a desire to generate therapeutic alternatives that could leverage the broad mechanisms of action of IVIg while(More)
Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies are major drivers of autoimmune pathology, but they are also used in the form of intravenous IgG (IVIg) therapy to suppress autoantibody activity. To identify the pathways underlying human autoantibody and IVIg activity, we established a humanized mouse model of an autoantibody-dependent autoimmune disease responding to(More)
Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies confer protection against pathogenic microorganisms, serve as therapeutics in tumor therapy, and are involved in destruction of healthy tissues during autoimmune diseases. Understanding the molecular pathways and effector cell types involved in antibody-mediated effector functions is a prerequisite to modulate these(More)
Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) therapy is widely used to treat a variety of autoimmune diseases including immunothrombocytopenia, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, and more recently autoimmune skin blistering diseases. Despite this well-documented clinical success, the precise molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying this(More)
Intravenous immunoglobulin G (IVIg) therapy is widely used to treat autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Recent evidence suggests that in mice, splenic resident cells might be important for the anti-inflammatory activity of IVIg in a model of serum transfer arthritis. Splenectomized human immunothrombocytopenia (ITP) patients, however, still respond to(More)
Intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIgs) efficiently suppress a variety of autoimmune diseases. Over the past few years several potential mechanisms underlying this antiinflammatory activity have become apparent. Among these, terminal sialic acid residues in the sugar moiety of the immunoglobulin G constant fragment have been shown to be critical for the(More)
Immunoglobulin G (IgG) molecules can have two completely opposing activities. They can be very potent pro-inflammatory mediators on the one hand, directing the effector functions of the innate immune system towards infected cells, tumor cells or healthy tissues in the case of autoimmune diseases. On the other hand, a mixture of IgG molecules purified from(More)
An NMR technique is described which allows the observation of ionic charge carriers moving in the electric field within a porous system saturated with electrolyte solution. This method, which was recently developed in our laboratory, gives experimental access to the study of electric transport in disordered media on a microscopic level and offers new(More)