Iku Tsutsui-Kimura

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Nicotine, a major addictive component of tobacco, has been suggested to provoke impulsivity by activating central α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Although lesion studies have demonstrated the involvement of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in impulsive action, the precise brain sites responsible for nicotine-induced impulsive action have(More)
Impulsivity is a pathological symptom in several psychiatric disorders, underscoring the need for animal models of impulsive action to develop a brief screening method for novel therapeutic agents of impulsive action. The aims of this study were (i) to evaluate whether the three-choice serial reaction time task (3-CSRTT), a simple version of the five-choice(More)
Higher impulsivity is a pathological symptom in several psychiatric disorders, including bipolar disorder, and is a risk factor for suicide. Our goal was to determine whether major mood-stabilizing drugs used for the treatment of bipolar disorder could suppress impulsive-like action in the three-choice serial reaction time task (3-CSRTT). Following training(More)
Nicotine has been well established as an impulsive action-inducing agent, but it remains unknown whether endogenous acetylcholine affects impulsive action via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. In the present study, the 3-choice serial reaction time task (3-CSRTT), a simple and valid assessment of impulsive action, was employed. Male Wistar/ST rats were(More)
BACKGROUND Deficits in impulse control are often observed in psychiatric disorders in which abnormalities of the prefrontal cortex are observed, including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and bipolar disorder. We recently found that milnacipran, a serotonin/noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, could suppress impulsive action in normal rats. However,(More)
Higher impulsivity is observed in several psychiatric disorders and could be a risk factor for drug addiction, criminal involvement, and suicide. Although the involvement of the 5-HT1A receptor in impulsive behavior has been indicated, the effects of clinically relevant drugs have been rarely tested. In the present study, we examined whether(More)
Several different studies have separately established that serotonin, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptors, and the hippocampus are involved in fear memory retrieval. The main aim of this study is to connect these separate studies. To assess the levels of anxiety/fear, we used the contextual fear-conditioning test and the elevated plus maze test(More)
Higher impulsivity is thought to be a risk factor for drug addiction, criminal involvement, and suicide. Excessive levels of impulsivity are often observed in several psychiatric disorders including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and schizophrenia. Previous studies have demonstrated that nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are involved in(More)
Poor impulse control is a debilitating condition observed in various psychiatric disorders and could be a risk factor for drug addiction, criminal involvement, and suicide. The rat infralimbic cortex (IL), located in the ventral portion of the medial prefrontal cortex, has been implicated in impulse control. To elucidate the neurophysiological basis of(More)