Ichiro Suzuki

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Consider a system of multiple mobile robots in which each robot, at infinitely many unpredictable time instants, observes the positions of all the robots and moves to a new position determined by the given algorithm. The robots are anonymous in the sense that they all execute the same algorithm and they cannot be distinguished by their appearances.(More)
We present a distributed algorithm for converging autonomous mobile robots with limited visibility toward a single point. Each robot is an omnidirectional mobile processor that repeatedly: 1) observes the relative positions of those robots that are visible; 2) computes its new position based on the observation using the given algorithm; 3) moves to that(More)
A distributed algorithm is presented that realizes mutual exclusion among <italic>N</italic> nodes in a computer network. The algorithm requires at most <italic>N</italic> message exchanges for one mutual exclusion invocation. Accordingly, the delay to invoke mutual exclusion is smaller than in an algorithm of Ricart and Agrawala, which requires(More)
We discuss the computation of somatosensory information from motion-capture data. The efficient computational algorithms previously developed by the authors for multibody systems, such as humanoid robots, are applied to a musculoskeletal model of the human body. The somatosensory information includes tension, length, and velocity of the muscles, tension of(More)
We discuss fundamental formation and agreement problems for autonomous, synchronous robots with limited visibility. Each robots is a mobile processor that, at each discrete time instant, observes the relative positions of those robots that are within distance V of itself, computes its new position using the given algorithm, and then moves to that position.(More)
Consider a system of multiple mobile robots in which each robot, at innnitely many unpredictable time instants, observes the positions of all the robots and moves to a new position determined by the given algorithm. The robots are anonymous in the sense that they all execute the same algorithm and they cannot be distinguished by their appearances. The(More)