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The ash dieback crisis: genetic variation in resistance can prove a long‐term solution
TLDR
Following a period of high mortality in natural populations, selection and breeding of remaining viable ash trees could provide a route for restoring the role of ash in the landscape and it is recommended that resistant trees (genotypes) should be selected to facilitate conservation of the species. Expand
Associations among symptoms of dieback in even-aged stands of ash (Fraxinus excelsior L.)
TLDR
The analysis suggested that the observed symptoms of crown dieback are caused by a primary disease, and the development of phytosanitary prescriptions for silviculture should primarily be targeted towards young stands as these represent the most critical phases of stand development. Expand
Occurrence and pathogenicity of fungi in necrotic and non-symptomatic shoots of declining common ash (Fraxinus excelsior) in Sweden
TLDR
Thirty-four isolates from 24 fungal taxa were used for artificial inoculations of 277 1-year-old F. excelsior seedlings in bare root nursery, and moderate to high similarity of fungal communities was observed in shoots despite the symptoms. Expand
Somatic compatibility in Amylostereum areolatum and A. chailletii as a consequence of symbiosis with siricid woodwasps
TLDR
The association between woodwasps and fungi creates dispersive clones or VCGs which are stable across time and space, and the dispersal through basidiospores may be considered of less importance for A. areolatum, but common in A. chailletii. Expand
Genetic resistance to Hymenoscyphus pseudoalbidus limits fungal growth and symptom occurrence in Fraxinus excelsior
TLDR
It is suggested that healthier clones are able to limit the growth and spread of the fungus and thereby minimize the occurrence of symptoms, which gives hope for the future preservation of F. excelsior in Europe through selection and breeding. Expand
Forest pathogens with higher damage potential due to climate change in Europe
TLDR
Some priorities to improve the ability to predict impacts of climate change on tree diseases are discussed and pathogens with evolutionary potential for greater damage should be identified to estimate the magnitude of the threat and to prepare for the changing conditions. Expand
Clonality and genetic variation in Amylostereum areolatum and A. chailletii from northern Europe
TLDR
M13 fingerprinting detected low genetic differentiation in both species in the samples the authors studied, suggesting that VCGs correspond to clones. Expand
Fungal symbionts of siricid woodwasps: isolation techniques and identification
TLDR
European woodwasps of the genera Sirex and Urocerus have symbiotic relationships with basidiomycetes, Amylostereum chailletii and A. areolatum, and isolation of the fungi from wood and fruitbodies is described briefly. Expand
Rapid invasion by an aggressive pathogenic fungus (Hymenoscyphus pseudoalbidus) replaces a native decomposer (Hymenoscyphus albidus): a case of local cryptic extinction?
TLDR
It is suggested that expanding H. pseudoalbidus excludes H. albidus from its niche resulting in H.Albidus becoming a rare species in Denmark, which is perhaps already locally extinct. Expand
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