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The genome of Laccaria bicolor provides insights into mycorrhizal symbiosis
Mycorrhizal symbioses—the union of roots and soil fungi—are universal in terrestrial ecosystems and may have been fundamental to land colonization by plants. Boreal, temperate and montane forests allExpand
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DIFFERENT ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL FUNGAL SPECIES ARE POTENTIAL DETERMINANTS OF PLANT COMMUNITY STRUCTURE
Almost all natural plant communities contain arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). We hypothesized that the species composition of AMF communities could have the potential to determine plant communityExpand
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Identification of ribosomal DNA polymorphisms among and within spores of the Glomales: application to studies on the genetic diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities
summary Little information currently exists on species diversity in communities of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), mainly owing to difficulties in identification of field extracted spores on theExpand
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Mycorrhizal ecology and evolution: the past, the present, and the future.
Almost all land plants form symbiotic associations with mycorrhizal fungi. These below-ground fungi play a key role in terrestrial ecosystems as they regulate nutrient and carbon cycles, andExpand
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Genome of an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus provides insight into the oldest plant symbiosis
Significance The arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis between fungi of the Glomeromycota phylum and plants involves more than two-thirds of all known plant species, including important crop species. ThisExpand
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Evidence for the evolution of multiple genomes in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi
Ancient asexuals directly contradict the evolutionary theories that explain why organisms should evolve a sexual life history. The mutualistic, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi are thought to have beenExpand
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High genetic variability and low local diversity in a population of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.
Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are ecologically important root symbionts of most terrestrial plants. Ecological studies of AMF have concentrated on differences between species; largely assumingExpand
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SOIL TILLAGE AFFECTS THE COMMUNITY STRUCTURE OF MYCORRHIZAL FUNGI IN MAIZE ROOTS
In this study we tested whether communities of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) colonizing the roots of maize (Zea mays L.) were affected by soil tillage practices (plowing, chiseling, and no-till)Expand
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The transcriptome of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices (DAOM 197198) reveals functional tradeoffs in an obligate symbiont.
• The arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis is arguably the most ecologically important eukaryotic symbiosis, yet it is poorly understood at the molecular level. To provide novel insights into theExpand
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Nonself vegetative fusion and genetic exchange in the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices.
Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) form symbioses with the majority of plants and form extensive underground hyphal networks simultaneously connecting the roots of different plant species. NoExpand
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