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Mycorrhizal fungal diversity determines plant biodiversity, ecosystem variability and productivity
TLDR
It is shown that below-ground diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) is a major factor contributing to the maintenance of plant biodiversity and to ecosystem functioning, and that microbial interactions can drive ecosystem functions such as plant biodiversity, productivity and variability.
Diversity and structure of AMF communities as affected by tillage in a temperate soil
TLDR
The community structure of AMF in the field soil was significantly affected by tillage treatment, however, no significant differences in AMF diversity were detected among different soil tillage treatments and the use of trap cultures for fungal diversity estimation in comparison with direct observation of field samples is discussed.
The genome of Laccaria bicolor provides insights into mycorrhizal symbiosis
TLDR
The predicted gene inventory of the L. bicolor genome points to previously unknown mechanisms of symbiosis operating in biotrophic mycorrhizal fungi, providing an unparalleled opportunity to develop a deeper understanding of the processes by which symbionts interact with plants within their ecosystem to perform vital functions in the carbon and nitrogen cycles that are fundamental to sustainable plant productivity.
DIFFERENT ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL FUNGAL SPECIES ARE POTENTIAL DETERMINANTS OF PLANT COMMUNITY STRUCTURE
TLDR
AMF species that co-occur as natural AMF communities have the potential to determine plant community structure, and that future studies on plant population and community structure need to consider the strength of their role as a determinant.
Identification of ribosomal DNA polymorphisms among and within spores of the Glomales: application to studies on the genetic diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities
TLDR
The results suggest that the diversity in natural AMF communities and the genetic diversity within individual spores might he much greater than previously thought.
Genome of an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus provides insight into the oldest plant symbiosis
TLDR
The genome of Rhizophagus irregularis provides insight into genes involved in obligate biotrophy and mycorrhizal symbioses and the evolution of an ancient asexual organism, and is of fundamental importance to the field of genome evolution.
Mycorrhizal ecology and evolution: the past, the present, and the future.
TLDR
Large-scale molecular surveys have provided novel insights into the diversity, spatial and temporal dynamics of mycorrhizal fungal communities, and network theory makes it possible to analyze interactions between plant-fungal partners as complex underground multi-species networks.
Evidence for the evolution of multiple genomes in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi
TLDR
It is concluded that mycorrhizal fungi have evolved to be multi-genomic, through accumulation of mutations in an essentially clonal genome, with some infrequent recombination events.
SOIL TILLAGE AFFECTS THE COMMUNITY STRUCTURE OF MYCORRHIZAL FUNGI IN MAIZE ROOTS
TLDR
Whether communities of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi colonizing the roots of maize were affected by soil tillage practices in a long-term field experiment carried out in Tanikon (Switzerland) is tested.
High genetic variability and low local diversity in a population of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.
TLDR
Genetic variation exceeded variation in quantitative genetic traits, indicating that selection acted on the population to retain similar traits, which might be because of the multigenomic nature of AMF, where considerable genetic redundancy could buffer the effects of changes in the genetic content of phenotypic traits.
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