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Fossil evidence on evolution of inner ear cochlea in Jurassic mammals
TLDR
The cochlear innervation in Dryolestes is the precursory condition in the curve-to-coil transformation of the cochlea in mammalian phylogeny, which provides the timing of the evolution, and where along the phylogeny the morphogenetic genes were co-opted into patterning the coChlear Innervation.
Petrosal anatomy and inner ear structures of the Late Jurassic Henkelotherium (Mammalia, Cladotheria, Dryolestoidea): insight into the early evolution of the ear region in cladotherian mammals
TLDR
The reconstruction of the petrosal and inner ear features of the Late Jurassic dryolestoid mammal Henkelotherium guimarotae from high‐resolution computed tomography and three‐dimensional imaging analysis suggests a more ancient origination for high‐frequency hearing in mammalian history than previously thought.
Study of a digital cranial endocast of the non-mammaliaform cynodont Brasilitherium riograndensis (Later Triassic, Brazil) and its relevance to the evolution of the mammalian brain
TLDR
The proposition of an early evolution of the mammalian brain associated with selective pressures for better sensorial acuity is supported, especially regarding improved olfaction, which began with small Triassic mammaliamorphs.
The petrosal and inner ear of the Late Jurassic cladotherian mammal Dryolestes leiriensis and implications for ear evolution in therian mammals
TLDR
These cochlear features originated prior to the full coiling of the therian mammal cochlea beyond one full turn, suggesting that the adaptation to hearing a wider range of sound frequencies, especially higher frequencies with refined resolution, has an ancient evolutionary origin no later than the Late Jurassic in therian evolution.
Reinvestigation of the Basicranium of Haldanodon Exspectatus (Mammaliaformes, Docodonta)
TLDR
The curved cochlear canal and the pneumatized middle ear region support the hypothesis that Haldanodon had more effective low-frequency hearing as an adaptation to a fossorial mode of life.
High morphological variation of vestibular system accompanies slow and infrequent locomotion in three-toed sloths
TLDR
The study demonstrates that extant three-toed sloths show a high level of morphological variation of the bony labyrinth of the inner ear, and suggests that a release of selection and/or constraints on their organ of balance is associated with the observed wide range of phenotypes.
Petrosal and inner ear anatomy and allometry amongst specimens referred to Litopterna (Placentalia)
TLDR
New isolated petrosals from the Itaborai beds of Brazil are described and referred to the early diverging litoptern Miguelsoria parayirunhor, based on phylogenetic, size, and abundance arguments, and several features such as a (sub)quadrangular and anteroposteriorly elongated tensor tympani fossa may constitute synapomorphies for Litopterna.
Digital Reconstruction of the Otic Region and Inner Ear of the Non-Mammalian Cynodont Brasilitherium riograndensis (Late Triassic, Brazil) and Its Relevance to the Evolution of the Mammalian Ear
TLDR
Brasilitherium fits in a sequence of gradual elongation of the cochlear canal associated with the enhancement in the capacity to hear higher frequencies among the constraints that might have triggered these transformations in small, insectivorous, and possibly nocturnal Mesozoic cynodont taxa is the improvement of detecting acoustically active insects.
Morphology of the Nasal Capsule of Primates—With Special Reference to Daubentonia and Homo
TLDR
It can be demonstrated that the evolutionary reductions within the primate nasal capsule mainly affect those structures associated with olfaction, whereas cartilages that are important for the biomechanics of the facial skull of the fetus persist.
Bony labyrinth morphometry indicates locomotor adaptations in the squirrel-related clade (Rodentia, Mammalia)
TLDR
The inner ear of flying and gliding mammals is less sensitive due to the large information flow into this sense organ during locomotion, with a higher sensitivity of the SCs in fossorial species than in flying taxa.
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