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Moths of Australia
Part 1 Moths and their environment: structure and life history biology population control economic significance evolution and geographical distribution the family classification of moths. Part 2 TheExpand
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A study of the ecology of the adult bogong moth, Agrotis Infusa (Boisd) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), with special reference to its behaviour during migration and aestivation.
Observations have been made during three summers on the ecology and behaviour of the bogong moth, Agrotis infusa (Boisd.) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), which occurs in large assemblages at altitudesExpand
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Oecophorine Genera of Australia I: The Wingia Group (Lepidoptera: Oecophoridae)
The present volume presents a revision of the Wingia group of 91 genera, a group which appears to be almost entirely endemic to Australia. Detailed information is provided on the morphology,Expand
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A NEW FAMILY OF DACNONYPHA (LEPIDOPTERA) BASED ON THREE NEW SPECIES FROM SOUTHERN AUSTRALIA, WITH NOTES ON THE AGATHIPHAGIDAE
A new family Lophocoronidae is proposed in the Dacnonypha for the new genus Lophocorona, with three new species from southern Australia, L. pediasia, L. astiptica, and L. melanora. Comparative notesExpand
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A revision of the Australian stem borers hitherto referred to Schòenobius and Scirpophaga (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae, Schoenobiinae).
The Australian pyralid stem borers of Gramineae, Cyperaceae, and Juncaceae, previously assigned to Schoenobius Duponchel and Scirpophaga Treitschke, are here referred to six genera. ScirpophagaExpand
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Butterflies of Australia
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Oecophorine genera of Australia. III. The Barea group and unplaced genera (Lepidoptera: Oecophoridae).
This volume completes the revision of the oecophorine genera of Australia, a subfamily which has diversified enormously in this country and represents some 20% of the Australian lepidoptera. TheExpand
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A WING‐LOCKING OR STRIDULATORY DEVICE IN LEPIDOPTERA
A mechanism found in the Lepidoptera for locking the wings in the folded position is described, and its distribution in the Order discussed. In the Cossidae and some other larger Lepidoptera theExpand
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