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The genetic history of Ice Age Europe
Modern humans arrived in Europe ~45,000 years ago, but little is known about their genetic composition before the start of farming ~8,500 years ago. We analyze genome-wide data from 51 Eurasians from
New data on the late Neandertals: direct dating of the Belgian Spy fossils.
TLDR
The results show that Neandertals survived to at least approximately 36,000 BP in Belgium and that the Spy fossils may be associated to the Lincombian-Ranisian-Jerzmanowician, a transitional techno-complex defined in northwest Europe and recognized in the Spy collections.
Reconstructing the Genetic History of Late Neandertals
TLDR
It is found that the bulk of Neanderthal gene flow into early modern humans originated from one or more source populations that diverged from the Neanderthals that were studied here at least 70,000 years ago, but after they split from a previously sequenced Neanderthal from Siberia around 150,000 year ago.
Ancient West African foragers in the context of African population history
TLDR
An Africa-wide phylogeny is infer that features widespread admixture and three prominent radiations, including one that gave rise to at least four major lineages deep in the history of modern humans.
Modern human cranial diversity in the Late Pleistocene of Africa and Eurasia: evidence from Nazlet Khater, Peştera cu Oase, and Hofmeyr.
TLDR
Comparison of Holocene and Late Pleistocene craniometric variation through resampling analyses supports hypotheses derived from genetic data suggesting that present phenotypic variation may represent only a restricted part of Late Pleistsocene human diversity.
Evidence supporting an intentional Neandertal burial at La Chapelle-aux-Saints
TLDR
This project has concluded that the Neandertal of La Chapelle-aux-Saints was deposit in a pit dug by other members of its group and protected by a rapid covering from any disturbance, supporting the hypothesis of an intentional burial.
The Spy VI child: a newly discovered Neandertal infant.
Temporal labyrinths of eastern Eurasian Pleistocene humans
TLDR
Questions are raised regarding possible cranial and postcranial morphological correlates of Homo labyrinthine variation, the use of individual “Neandertal” features for documenting population affinities, and the nature of late archaic human variation across Eurasia.
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