I. Levin

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The formation of secondary metastatic growths is characteristic of carcinoma as well as of sarcoma and presents the chief element of the malignancy of these tumors. A true metastatic growth is a secondary nodule formed in a distant organ or part of the body not contiguous to the primary tumor, and it should not be confused with even the most extensive local(More)
E v e r y m a l i g n a n t g r o w t h , w h e t h e r c a r c i n o m a or s a r c o m a , consists of t w o p a r t s : p a r e n c h y m a , c o m p o s e d of c a n c e r cells; a n d a connective tissue g r o u n d work, or stroma, which is d i s t r i b u t e d a r o u n d a n d b e t w e e n the cells of the p a r e n c h y m a. T h e t r u e(More)
The term metastasis was originally used to indicate the transportation of any substance, whether metal or coal dust, normal cells (placenta, bone marrow), bacteria, or cancer cells from one part of the organism to another, yon Recklinghausen (I) was the first to restrict the meaning of the term and used it only in connection with the transportation of(More)
PLATES 1-IV. The function of a blood-vessel is purely mechanical and consists either in lessening the strength of the onrushing blood sent by the systole o4 the heart, or in assisting' the blood-flow, the strength of which is diminished as it nears the periphery. Both of these ftmCtions are taken up by the elastic and muscular fibers of the media. In view(More)
The analysis of the experiments described above indicates that tumors of the white rat or white mouse inoculated into parenchymatous organs acquire a different biological character from those inoculated subcutaneously. The latter are a great deal more benign in their behavior than human cancer or spontaneous tumors in the same species of animals. Tumors(More)
An analysis of the results of the experiments reported in this investigation shows that the changes so frequently observed in tissues surrounding a growing tumor may be caused by different conditions. The development and growth of a malignant tumor depends upon a local interaction between tumor cells and organ cells. When the cells of a normal organ are(More)
There is hardly any doubt left in the minds of pathologists that the transplantable tumors in the white rats and mice, recently discovered by Hanau (I) , L. Loeb (2), Jensen (3)and others, resemble clinically very closely human carcinoma and sarcoma. These tumors grow to large size, occasionally weighing as much as the animal on which they grow; they are(More)
PLATES 23-25. For all future investigation of the cancer problem, it is o,f the utmost importance to ascertain whether the disease is, in its early stages, a purely local condition and whether al.l the clinical' symptoms are subsequent to the dissemination of the tumor, or whether it is, even in its incipiency, a general parasitic or consti.t~ional disease.(More)
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