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Widely thought to be a housekeeping process, the regulation and synthesis of rRNA emerges as a potentially central mechanism for the maintenance of synaptic plasticity and memory. We have recently shown that an essential component of late-phase synaptic plasticity is rRNA biosynthesis - the rate-limiting step in the production of new ribosomes. We(More)
BACKGROUND & AIMS An extrahepatic human neutrophil collagenase complementary DNA (matrix metalloprotease-8) cloned in an adenovirus vector was used as a therapeutic agent in cirrhosis. METHODS A high titer of clinical-grade AdMMP8 was obtained. RESULTS HeLa cells transduced with AdMMP8 expressed recombinant matrix metalloprotease-8 messenger RNA and(More)
Activity-dependent long-term synaptic plasticity requires gene expression and protein synthesis. Identifying essential genes and studying their transcriptional and translational regulation are key steps to understanding how synaptic changes become long lasting. Recently, the enzyme poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) was shown to be necessary for(More)
Long-term memory (LTM) formation requires new protein synthesis and new gene expression. Based on our work in Aplysia, we hypothesized that the rRNA genes, stimulation-dependent targets of the enzyme Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), are primary effectors of the activity-dependent changes in synaptic function that maintain synaptic plasticity and(More)
One contribution of 35 to a Discussion Meeting Issue 'Synaptic plasticity in health and disease'. In contrast to protein kinases that participate in long-term potentiation (LTP) induction and memory consolidation, the autonomously active atypical protein kinase C isoform, protein kinase Mzeta (PKMz), functions in the core molecular mechanism of LTP(More)
Expression, localization and regulation of different cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) subunits account for specificity in the intracellular cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. In Aplysia neurons, two classes of PKA (I and II) differing in their regulatory (R) subunits have been characterized. Type I is mostly soluble in the cell body, and type II enriched at(More)
In contrast to protein kinases that participate in long-term potentiation (LTP) induction and memory consolidation, the autonomously active atypical protein kinase C isoform, protein kinase Mzeta (PKMζ), functions in the core molecular mechanism of LTP maintenance and long-term memory storage. Here, using multiple complementary techniques for light and(More)
Synaptic dysfunction is thought to play a major role in memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease (AD). PARP-1 has been identified as an epigenetic regulator of plasticity and memory. Thus, we hypothesize that PARP-1 may be altered in postmortem hippocampus of individuals with AD compared to age-matched controls without neurologic disease. We found a reduced(More)
PKA type I and type II are activated in Aplysia neurons by stimulation with serotonin (5-HT), which causes long-term facilitation (LTF). The proteolysis of the regulatory subunit (R) is thought important for the persistent activation of PKA, which is necessary to produce LTF. In this study, we report that the type I regulatory subunit (RI) and type II(More)
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