Hwei-yen Chen

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Aging affects nearly all organisms, but how aging evolves is still unclear. The central prediction of classic theory is that high extrinsic mortality leads to accelerated aging and shorter intrinsic life span. However, this prediction considers mortality as a random process, whereas mortality in nature is likely to be condition dependent. Therefore, the(More)
Males and females age at different rates and have different life expectancies across the animal kingdom, but what causes the longevity "gender gaps" remains one of the most fiercely debated puzzles among biologists and demographers. Classic theory predicts that the sex experiencing higher rate of extrinsic mortality evolves faster aging and reduced(More)
While ageing is commonly associated with exponential increase in mortality with age, mortality rates paradoxically decelerate late in life resulting in distinct mortality plateaus. Late-life mortality plateaus have been discovered in a broad variety of taxa, including humans, but their origin is hotly debated. One hypothesis argues that deceleration occurs(More)
Correspondence to: Alexei Maklakov; Email: Alexei.Maklakov@ebc.uu.se Organisms age because of the “selection shadow”—the decline of the force of natural selection with age. Seemingly straightforward corollary of this theory is the Medawar-Williams prediction, which maintains that increased extrinsic (non-aging) mortality will result in the evolution of(More)
Despite tremendous progress in finding genes that, when manipulated, affects lifespan, little is known about the genetics underlying natural variation in lifespan. While segregating genetic variants for lifespan has been notoriously difficult to find in genome-wide association studies (GWAS), a complementary approach is to manipulate key genetic pathways in(More)
Organisms age because of the "selection shadow"-the decline of the force of natural selection with age. Seemingly straightforward corollary of this theory is the Medawar-Williams prediction, which maintains that increased extrinsic (non-aging) mortality will result in the evolution of accelerated aging and decreased longevity. Despite its centrality to(More)
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