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Magnetic fields are proposed to have played a critical role in some of the most enigmatic processes of planetary formation by mediating the rapid accretion of disk material onto the central star and the formation of the first solids. However, there have been no experimental constraints on the intensity of these fields. Here we show that dusty(More)
The carbon in ancient carbonaceous chondritic meteorites is mainly in a hydrocarbon composite similar to terrestrial kerogen, a cross-linked structure of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons. Until recently, the composite has been commonly thought to have been produced in the early solar nebula by a Fischer-Tropsch-type process, involving the catalytic(More)
The geomagnetic field is predominantly dipolar today, and high-fidelity paleomagnetic mean directions from all over the globe strongly support the geocentric axial dipole (GAD) hypothesis for the past few million years. However, the bulk of paleointensity data fails to coincide with the axial dipole prediction of a factor-of-2 equator-to-pole increase in(More)
New rock magnetic results (thermal fluctuation tomography, high-resolution first-order reversal curves and low temperature measurements) for samples from the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum and carbon isotope excursion in cored sections at Ancora and Wilson Lake on the Atlantic Coastal Plain of New Jersey indicate the presence of predominantly isolated,(More)
INTRODUCTION The following, who are listed in alphabetic order, are responsible for the given sections: The Double Trouble site (October–November 2008) was the thirteenth continuously cored borehole drilled as part of the New Jersey Coastal Plain Drilling Project (NJCPDP) and the tenth site drilled as part of Leg 174AX (Fig.
The Paleocene-Eocene boundary (∼55.8 million years ago) is marked by an abrupt negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE) that coincides with an oxygen isotope decrease interpreted as the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum. Biogenic magnetite (Fe3O4) in the form of giant (micron-sized) spearhead-like and spindle-like magnetofossils, as well as nano-sized(More)
A key stage in planet formation is the evolution of a gaseous and magnetized solar nebula. However, the lifetime of the nebular magnetic field and nebula are poorly constrained. We present paleomagnetic analyses of volcanic angrites demonstrating that they formed in a near-zero magnetic field (<0.6 microtesla) at 4563.5 ± 0.1 million years ago, ~3.8 million(More)
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