Hsiao-hua K. Burke

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■ Spectral imaging for remote sensing of terrestrial features and objects arose as an alternative to high-spatial-resolution, large-aperture satellite imaging systems. Early applications of spectral imaging were oriented toward ground-cover classification, mineral exploration, and agricultural assessment, employing a small number of carefully chosen(More)
VOLUME 15, NUMBER 2, 2005 LINCOLN LABORATORY JOURNAL 271 Hyperspectral imaging sensors have been used for more than a decade to aid in the detection and identification of diverse surface targets, topographical details, and geological features. Techniques for scene characterization can utilize individual or combined spectral bands to identify specific(More)
■ We present two examples that show how fusing data from hyperspectral imaging (HSI) sensors with data from other sensors can enhance overall detection and classification performance. The first example involves fusing HSI data with foliage-penetration synthetic aperture radar (FOPEN SAR) data; the second example involves fusing HSI data with high-resolution(More)
This paper presents an analysis of radiometric data taken at 21, 2.8, and 1.67 cm during a NASA sponsored flight over agricultural fields in Phoenix, AZ. The objective of the mission was to provide comprehensive information concerning microwave responses due to a broad range of soil moisture contents. Generally, data taken over bare fields agree well with(More)
Longwave Infrared (LWIR) radiation comprising atmospheric and surface emissions provides information for a number of applications including atmospheric profiling, surface temperature and emissivity estimation, and cloud depiction and characterization. The LWIR spectrum also contains absorption lines for numerous molecular species which can be utilized in(More)
The EO-1 satellite is part of NASA's New Millennium Program (NMP). It consists of three imaging sensors: the multispectral Advanced Land Imager (ALI), Hyperion and Atmospheric Corrector. Hyperion provides a high-resolution hyperspectral imager capable of resolving 220 spectral bands (from 0.4 to 2.5 micron) with a 30 m resolution. Three examples of EO-1(More)
Hyperspectral imaging sensors have been used for more than a decade to aid in the detection and identification of diverse surface targets, topographical and geological features. It is clear to the user, however, that hyperspectral data are not immune to the effects of the intervening atmosphere. The term “atmospheric compensation” refers to the removal of(More)