Howard A Bussey

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A genome-scale genetic interaction map was constructed by examining 5.4 million gene-gene pairs for synthetic genetic interactions, generating quantitative genetic interaction profiles for approximately 75% of all genes in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A network based on genetic interaction profiles reveals a functional map of the cell in(More)
In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, more than 80% of the approximately 6200 predicted genes are nonessential, implying that the genome is buffered from the phenotypic consequences of genetic perturbation. To evaluate function, we developed a method for systematic construction of double mutants, termed synthetic genetic array (SGA) analysis, in which a query(More)
The functions of many open reading frames (ORFs) identified in genome-sequencing projects are unknown. New, whole-genome approaches are required to systematically determine their function. A total of 6925 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were constructed, by a high-throughput strategy, each with a precise deletion of one of 2026 ORFs (more than one-third of(More)
Determining the effect of gene deletion is a fundamental approach to understanding gene function. Conventional genetic screens exhibit biases, and genes contributing to a phenotype are often missed. We systematically constructed a nearly complete collection of gene-deletion mutants (96% of annotated open reading frames, or ORFs) of the yeast Saccharomyces(More)
A genetic interaction network containing approximately 1000 genes and approximately 4000 interactions was mapped by crossing mutations in 132 different query genes into a set of approximately 4700 viable gene yeast deletion mutants and scoring the double mutant progeny for fitness defects. Network connectivity was predictive of function because interactions(More)
Protein interactions regulate the systems-level behavior of cells; thus, deciphering the structure and dynamics of protein interaction networks in their cellular context is a central goal in biology. We have performed a genome-wide in vivo screen for protein-protein interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by means of a protein-fragment complementation(More)
The genome of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been completely sequenced through a worldwide collaboration. The sequence of 12,068 kilobases defines 5885 potential protein-encoding genes, approximately 140 genes specifying ribosomal RNA, 40 genes for small nuclear RNA molecules, and 275 transfer RNA genes. In addition, the complete sequence provides(More)
The development and application of genetic tools and resources has enabled a partial genetic-interaction network for the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to be compiled. Analysis of the network, which is ongoing, has already provided a clear picture of the nature and scale of the genetic interactions that robustly sustain biological systems, and how cellular(More)
BACKGROUND Large-scale studies have revealed networks of various biological interaction types, such as protein-protein interaction, genetic interaction, transcriptional regulation, sequence homology, and expression correlation. Recurring patterns of interconnection, or 'network motifs', have revealed biological insights for networks containing either one or(More)
Genetic interactions define overlapping functions and compensatory pathways. In particular, synthetic sick or lethal (SSL) genetic interactions are important for understanding how an organism tolerates random mutation, i.e., genetic robustness. Comprehensive identification of SSL relationships remains far from complete in any organism, because mapping these(More)