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Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by an expansion of exonic CAG triplet repeats in the gene encoding the huntingtin protein (Htt), however, the means by which neurodegeneration occurs remains obscure. There is evidence that mutant Htt interacts with transcription factors leading to reduced histone acetylation. We report that administration of the histone(More)
The precise cause of neuronal death in Huntington's disease (HD) is unknown. Although no single specific protein-protein interaction of mutant huntingtin has emerged as the pathologic trigger, transcriptional dysfunction may contribute to the neurodegeneration observed in HD. Pharmacological treatment using the histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium butyrate(More)
OBJECTIVE Alzheimer disease (AD) brains are deficient in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which regulates synaptic plasticity and memory. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are ∼22-nucleotide small noncoding RNAs that control a variety of physiological and disease processes. Here, we show that miR-206 regulates BDNF and memory function in AD mice. METHODS(More)
Transcriptional dysregulation and aberrant chromatin remodeling are central features in the pathology of Huntington's disease (HD). In order to more fully characterize these pathogenic events, an assessment of histone profiles and associated gene changes were performed in transgenic N171-82Q (82Q) and R6/2 HD mice. Analyses revealed significant chromatin(More)
Genetic murine models play an important role in the study of human neurological disorders by providing accurate and experimentally accessible systems to study pathogenesis and to test potential therapeutic treatments. One of the most widely employed models of Huntington's disease (HD) is the R6/2 transgenic mouse. To characterize this model further, we have(More)
We demonstrate that the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor drug trichostatin A (TSA) reduces spinal cord inflammation, demyelination, neuronal and axonal loss and ameliorates disability in the relapsing phase of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a model of multiple sclerosis (MS). TSA up-regulates antioxidant, anti-excitotoxicity and(More)
Chromatin remodeling and transcription regulation are tightly controlled under physiological conditions. It has been suggested that altered chromatin modulation and transcription dysfunction may play a role in the pathogenesis of Huntington's disease (HD). Increased histone methylation, a well established mechanism of gene silencing, results in(More)
L-Arginine is the only endogenous nitrogen-containing substrate of NO synthase (NOS), and it thus governs the production of NO during nervous system development as well as in disease states such as stroke, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and HIV dementia. The "arginine paradox" refers to the dependence of cellular NO production on exogenous(More)
In Alzheimer's disease (AD), memory impairment is the most prominent feature that afflicts patients and their families. Although reactive astrocytes have been observed around amyloid plaques since the disease was first described, their role in memory impairment has been poorly understood. Here, we show that reactive astrocytes aberrantly and abundantly(More)
Oxidative stress is believed to be an important mediator of neurodegeneration. However, the transcriptional pathways induced in neurons by oxidative stress that activate protective gene responses have yet to be fully delineated. We report that the transcription factor Sp1 is acetylated in response to oxidative stress in neurons. Histone deacetylase (HDAC)(More)