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MOTIVATION Prediction of protein folding patterns is one level deeper than that of protein structural classes, and hence is much more complicated and difficult. To deal with such a challenging problem, the ensemble classifier was introduced. It was formed by a set of basic classifiers, with each trained in different parameter systems, such as predicted(More)
One of the critical challenges in predicting protein subcellular localization is how to deal with the case of multiple location sites. Unfortunately, so far, no efforts have been made in this regard except for the one focused on the proteins in budding yeast only. For most existing predictors, the multiple-site proteins are either excluded from(More)
One of the fundamental goals in proteomics and cell biology is to identify the functions of proteins in various cellular organelles and pathways. Information of subcellular locations of proteins can provide useful insights for revealing their functions and understanding how they interact with each other in cellular network systems. Most of the existing(More)
Information of subcellular locations of proteins is important for in-depth studies of cell biology. It is very useful for proteomics, system biology and drug development as well. However, most existing methods for predicting protein subcellular location can only cover 5 to 12 location sites. Also, they are limited to deal with single-location proteins and(More)
Facing the explosion of newly generated protein sequences in the post genomic era, we are challenged to develop an automated method for fast and reliably annotating their subcellular locations. Knowledge of subcellular locations of proteins can provide useful hints for revealing their functions and understanding how they interact with each other in cellular(More)
A statistical analysis indicated that, of the 35,016 Gram-positive bacterial proteins from the recent Swiss-Prot database, approximately 57% of these entries are without subcellular location annotations. In the gene ontology database, the corresponding percentage is approximately 67%, meaning the percentage of proteins without subcellular component(More)
Predicting subcellular localization of human proteins is a challenging problem, especially when unknown query proteins do not have significant homology to proteins of known subcellular locations and when more locations need to be covered. To tackle the challenge, protein samples are expressed by hybridizing the gene ontology (GO) database and amphiphilic(More)
Predicting subcellular localization of human proteins is a challenging problem, particularly when query proteins may have a multiplex character, i.e., simultaneously exist at, or move between, two or more different subcellular location sites. In a previous study, we developed a predictor called "Hum-mPLoc" to deal with the multiplex problem for the human(More)
Proteins may simultaneously exist at, or move between, two or more different subcellular locations. Proteins with multiple locations or dynamic feature of this kind are particularly interesting because they may have some very special biological functions intriguing to investigators in both basic research and drug discovery. For instance, among the 6408(More)