• Publications
  • Influence
The "Antidirector Rights Index" Revisited
The "antidirector rights index" has been used as a measure of shareholder protection in over a hundred articles since it was introduced by La Porta et al. ("Law and Finance." 1998, Journal ofExpand
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Regulating Bankers' Pay
This paper seeks to make three contributions to understanding how banks’ executive pay has produced incentives for excessive risk-taking and how such pay should be reformed. First, although there isExpand
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The Wages of Failure: Executive Compensation at Bear Stearns and Lehman 2000-2008
The standard narrative of the meltdown of Bear Stearns and Lehman Brothers assumes that the wealth of the top executives of these firms was largely wiped out along with their firms. In the ongoingExpand
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Legal Origin or Colonial History?
Economists have documented pervasive correlations between legal origins, modern regulation, and economic outcomes around the world. Where legal origin is exogenous, however, it is almost perfectlyExpand
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On the Insignificance And/Or Endogeneity of La Porta Et Al.'s 'Anti-Director Rights Index' Under Consistent Coding
I re-code the "Antidirector Rights Index" (ADRI) of shareholder protection rules from La Porta et al. 1998 for 46 countries in 1997 and 2005 with the help of local lawyers. My emphasis is onExpand
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'Law and Finance' Revisited
The Antidirector Rights Index from La Porta et al.'s Law and Finance (1998) has been used as a measure of shareholder protection in almost 100 published studies. With articles by legal scholarsExpand
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Legal Origins, Civil Procedure, and the Quality of Contract Enforcement
This paper empirically compares civil procedure in common-law and civil-law countries. Using World-Bank and hand-collected data, and unlike earlier studies that used predecessor data sets, this paperExpand
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Large Sample, Quantitative Research Designs for Comparative Law?
A substantial body of comparative legal scholarship considers statements applicable to large, conceptually infinite numbers of countries. Such statements gain in credibility if they are supported byExpand
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The Myth of 'Rebalancing' Retaliation in WTO Dispute Settlement Practice
It is generally assumed that trade retaliation under the WTO performs some kind of 'rebalancing' by allowing the injured Member to suspend 'concessions and obligations' vis-a-vis the violating MemberExpand
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Empirical Comparative Law
I review the empirical comparative law literature with an emphasis on quantitative work. After situating the field and surveying its main applications to date, I turn to methodological issues. IExpand
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