Hisaaki Mihara

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Selenocysteine lyase (EC 4.4.1.16) exclusively decomposes selenocysteine to alanine and elemental selenium, whereas cysteine desulfurase (NIFS protein) of Azotobacter vinelandii acts indiscriminately on both cysteine and selenocysteine to produce elemental sulfur and selenium respectively, and alanine. These proteins exhibit some sequence homology. The(More)
Cysteine desulfurase is a pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP)-dependent homodimeric enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of L-cysteine to L-alanine and sulfane sulfur via the formation of a protein-bound cysteine persulfide intermediate on a conserved cysteine residue. Increased evidence for the functions of cysteine desulfurases has revealed their important roles(More)
NifS-like proteins catalyze the formation of elemental sulfur (S) and alanine from cysteine (Cys) or of elemental selenium (Se) and alanine from seleno-Cys. Cys desulfurase activity is required to produce the S of iron (Fe)-S clusters, whereas seleno-Cys lyase activity is needed for the incorporation of Se in selenoproteins. In plants, the chloroplast is(More)
Selenocysteine lyase (SCL) (EC 4.4.1.16) is a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent enzyme that specifically catalyzes the decomposition of L-selenocysteine to L-alanine and elemental selenium. The enzyme was proposed to function as a selenium delivery protein to selenophosphate synthetase in selenoprotein biosynthesis (Lacourciere, G. M., and Stadtman, T. C.(More)
The metabolic network is an important biological network which consists of enzymes and chemical compounds. However, a large number of metabolic pathways remains unknown, and most organism-specific metabolic pathways contain many missing enzymes. We present a novel method to identify the genes coding for missing enzymes using available genomic and chemical(More)
Cysteine desulfurases are pyridoxal 5′-phosphate-dependent homodimeric enzymes that catalyze the conversion of L-cysteine to L-alanine and sulfane sulfur via the formation of a protein-bound cysteine persulfide intermediate on a conserved cysteine residue. The enzymes are capable of donating the persulfide sulfur atoms to a variety of biosynthetic pathways(More)
Selenocysteine lyase is a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the exclusive decomposition of L-selenocysteine to L-alanine and elemental selenium. An open reading frame, named csdB, from Escherichia coli encodes a putative protein that is similar to selenocysteine lyase of pig liver and cysteine desulfurase (NifS) of Azotobacter(More)
Delta(1)-Piperideine-2-carboxylate/Delta(1)-pyrroline-2-carboxylate reductase from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato belongs to a novel sub-class in a large family of NAD(P)H-dependent oxidoreductases distinct from the conventional MDH/LDH superfamily characterized by the Rossmann fold. We have determined the structures of the following three forms of the(More)
Selenium (Se) toxicity is thought to be due to nonspecific incorporation of selenocysteine (Se-Cys) into proteins, replacing Cys. In an attempt to direct Se flow away from incorporation into proteins, a mouse (Mus musculus) Se-Cys lyase (SL) was expressed in the cytosol or chloroplasts of Arabidopsis. This enzyme specifically catalyzes the decomposition of(More)
IscS and IscU from Escherichia coli cooperate with each other in the biosynthesis of iron-sulfur clusters. IscS catalyzes the desulfurization of L-cysteine to produce L-alanine and sulfur. Cys-328 of IscS attacks the sulfur atom of L-cysteine, and the sulfane sulfur derived from L-cysteine binds to the Sgamma atom of Cys-328. In the course of the cluster(More)