Hiroyuki Otake

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Three sex-determining (SD) genes, SRY (mammals), Dmy (medaka), and DM-W (Xenopus laevis), have been identified to date in vertebrates. However, how and why a new sex-determining gene appears remains unknown, as do the switching mechanisms of the master sex-determining gene. Here, we used positional cloning to search for the sex-determining gene in Oryzias(More)
The medaka, Oryzias latipes, has an XX/XY sex determination mechanism. A Y-linked DM domain gene, DMY, has been isolated by positional cloning as a prime candidate for the sex-determining gene. Furthermore, the crucial role of DMY during male development was established by studying two wild-derived XY female mutants. In this study, to find new DMY and(More)
Testosterone is a final product of androgenic hormone biosynthesis, and Leydig cells are known to be the primary source of androgens. In the mammalian testis, two distinct populations of Leydig cells, the fetal and the adult Leydig cells, develop sequentially, and these two cell types differ both morphologically and functionally. It is well known that the(More)
Adrenal 4 binding protein/steroidogenic factor 1 (Ad4BP/SF-1) (Nr5a1) is a nuclear receptor essential for reproductive tissue development and endocrine regulation. This factor is expressed in steroidogenic tissues (e.g. adrenal glands and gonads), and expression of this factor is tightly regulated in a tissue and cell type-specific manner. Our previous(More)
Genetic deficiencies in transcription factors can lead to the loss of certain types of cells and tissue. The steroidogenic tissue-specific nuclear receptor Ad4BP/SF-1 (NR5A1) is one such gene, because mice in which this gene is disrupted fail to develop the adrenal gland and gonads. However, the specific role of Ad4BP/SF-1 in these biological events remains(More)
Two distinct types of Leydig cells emerge during the development of eutherian mammals. Fetal Leydig cells (FLCs) appear shortly after gonadal sex differentiation, and play a crucial role in masculinization of male fetuses. Meanwhile, adult Leydig cells (ALCs) emerge after birth and induce the secondary male-specific sexual maturation by producing(More)
The medaka, Oryzias latipes, has an XX/XY sex-determination mechanism. A Y-linked DM domain gene, DMY, has been isolated by positional cloning as a sex-determining gene in this species. Previously, we found 23 XY sex-reversed females from 11 localities by examining the genotypic sex of wild-caught medaka. Genetic analyses revealed that all these females had(More)
The medaka, Oryzias latipes, has an XX/XY sex-determination system, and a Y-linked DM-domain gene, DMY, is the sex-determining gene in this species. Since DMY appears to have arisen from a duplicated copy of the autosomal DMRT1 gene approximately 10 million years ago, the medaka Y chromosome is considered to be one of the youngest male-determining(More)
The teleost fish, medaka (Oryzias latipes), has an XX/XY sex-determining mechanism. A Y-linked DM domain gene, DMY, has been isolated by positional cloning as the sex-determining gene in this species. Previously, we conducted a field survey of genotypic sex and found that approximately 1% of wild medaka are sex-reversed (XX males and XY females). Here, we(More)
The male sex-determining gene, DMY, of the medaka is considered to have arisen via gene duplication of DMRT1. In the medaka, both genes are expressed in Sertoli cell lineage cells, but their temporal expression patterns are quite different. DMY expression starts just before the sex-determining period, whereas DMRT1 expression occurs during the testicular(More)