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Little information is available for neurosteroidogenesis in the central nervous system (CNS) of lower vertebrates. Therefore, in the present study, we examined the enzymatic activity and localization of 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/Delta5-Delta4-isomerase (3betaHSD), a key steroidogenic enzyme, in the CNS of adult male zebrafish to clarify central(More)
Neurosteroids are synthesized de novo in the brain and the cerebellar Purkinje cell is a major site for neurosteroid formation. We have demonstrated that the rat Purkinje cell actively produces progesterone de novo from cholesterol only during neonatal life and progesterone promotes dendritic growth, spinogenesis and synaptogenesis via its nuclear receptor(More)
Peripheral steroid hormones act on brain tissues through intracellular receptor-mediated mechanisms to regulate several important brain neuronal functions. Therefore, the brain is considered to be a target site of steroid hormones. However, it is now established that the brain itself also synthesizes steroids de novo from cholesterol. The pioneering(More)
Estrogens were originally identified as the primary sex steroid hormones in females and regulators of reproductive function and sexual behavior, but it has long been suggested that estrogens also have local effects on the somatosensory system at the spinal cord level. It is well known that the effects of estrogens are mediated by nuclear estrogen receptors(More)
Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) has recently been identified as an itch-specific neuropeptide in the spinal sensory system in mice, but there are no reports of the expression and distribution of GRP in the trigeminal sensory system in mammals. We characterized and compared GRP-immunoreactive (ir) neurons in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) with those in the rat(More)
The brain is considered to be a target site of peripheral steroid hormones. In contrast to this classical concept, new findings over the past decade have established that the brain itself also synthesizes steroids de novo from cholesterol through mechanisms at least partly independent of peripheral steroidogenic glands. Such steroids synthesized de novo in(More)
Previous studies on polytocous rodents have revealed that the fetal intrauterine position influences its later anatomy, physiology, reproductive performance and behavior. To investigate whether the position of a fetus in the uterus modifies the development of the brain, we examined whether the structure of the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area(More)
Neurosteroids are synthesized de novo in the brain, and the cerebellar Purkinje cell is a major site for neurosteroid formation. We have demonstrated that the Purkinje cell possesses intranuclear receptor for progesterone and actively produces progesterone de novo from cholesterol only during rat neonatal life, when cerebellar cortical formation occurs(More)
The amygdala modulates memory consolidation with the storage of emotionally relevant information and plays a critical role in fear and anxiety. We examined changes in neuronal morphology and neurotransmitter content in the amygdala of rats exposed to a single prolonged stress (SPS) as a putative animal model for human post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).(More)
The cerebellar Purkinje cell (PC) is a typical site for neurosteroid formation. We have demonstrated that this neuron possesses intranuclear receptor for progesterone and actively synthesizes progesterone de novo from cholesterol only during rat neonatal life, when the formation of the cerebellar cortex occurs dramatically. In this study, we therefore(More)