Herbert Chan

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INTRODUCTION The purpose of this paper is to assess the impact of administrative sanctions introduced as part of a new law for drinking drivers in British Columbia, Canada. The new law, known as immediate roadside prohibitions (IRP), aimed to increase the efficiency of police and courts for processing drinking drivers, thereby increasing the certainty of(More)
The February 2013 issue of the IJE included our study which used culpability analysis to examine the association of cellphone use with motor vehicle crashes. 1 In a commentary in the same issue, Sanghavi stated that 'culpability analysis won't help us understand crash risk due to cellphones'. 2 Sanghavi's categorical rejection of culpability analysis is(More)
BACKGROUND The use of a cell phone or communication device while driving is illegal in many jurisdictions, yet evidence evaluating the crash risk associated with cell phone use in naturalistic settings is limited. This article aims to determine whether cell phone use while driving increases motor vehicle crash culpability. Method Drivers involved in crashes(More)
OBJECTIVE Several traffic safety research techniques require researchers to separate crash-involved drivers into culpable and nonculpable. Nonculpable drivers are assumed to be randomly involved in crashes by external factors and to approximate a noncollision control population. If this is true, factors that increase crash risk should be found more often in(More)
OBJECTIVES We evaluated the public health benefits of traffic laws targeting speeding and drunk drivers (British Columbia, Canada, September 2010). METHODS We studied fatal crashes and ambulance dispatches and hospital admissions for road trauma, using interrupted time series with multiple nonequivalent comparison series. We determined estimates of effect(More)
OBJECTIVES Determine the prevalence of drug use in injured drivers and identify associated demographic factors and crash characteristics. DESIGN Prospective cross-sectional study. SETTING Seven trauma centres in British Columbia, Canada (2010-2012). PARTICIPANTS Automobile drivers who had blood obtained within 6 h of a crash. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES(More)
INTRODUCTION In 2010, British Columbia (BC) introduced new traffic laws designed to deter impaired driving, speeding, and distracted driving. These laws generated significant media attention and were associated with reductions in fatal crashes and in ambulance calls and hospital admissions for road trauma. OBJECTIVE To understand the extent and type of(More)
INTRODUCTION In 2010, British Columbia (BC) introduced new traffic laws designed to deter impaired driving, speeding, and distracted driving. These laws generated significant media attention and were associated with reductions in fatal crashes and in ambulance calls and hospital admissions for road trauma. OBJECTIVE To understand the extent and type of(More)
BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE Motor vehicle collisions (MVCs) remain a leading cause of death and serious injury in Canadian children. In July 2008, British Columbia introduced child safety seat legislation that aimed to reduce the number of children killed or injured in MVCs. This legislation upgraded previous child seat legislation (introduced in 1985) and(More)
OBJECTIVE Injured drivers with blood alcohol concentration (BAC) above the legal limit are rarely convicted of impaired driving. One explanation is that police may have difficulty recognizing alcohol intoxication in injured drivers. In this study, we compare police documentation of alcohol involvement with BAC measured on arrival at a hospital. Our(More)