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Although interleukin (IL) 17 has been extensively characterized, the function of IL-17F, which has an expression pattern regulated similarly to IL-17, is poorly understood. We show that like IL-17, IL-17F regulates proinflammatory gene expression in vitro, and this requires IL-17 receptor A, tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6, and Act1. In(More)
Deregulated expression of the Myc family of transcription factors (c-, N-, and L-myc) contributes to the development of many cancers by a mechanism believed to involve the stimulation of cell proliferation and inhibition of differentiation. However, using B cell-specific c-/N-myc double-knockout mice and E(mu)-myc transgenic mice bred onto genetic(More)
The molecular mechanisms underlying the initiation of innate and adaptive proallergic type 2 responses are not understood. Interleukin (IL) 25, a member of the IL-17 cytokine family, was recently reported (Owyang, A.M., C. Zaph, E.H. Wilson, K.J. Guild, T. McClanahan, H.R. Miller, D.J. Cua, M. Goldschmidt, C.A. Hunter, R.A. Kastelein, and D. Artis. 2006. J.(More)
The coordination of nutrient and energy availability with cell growth and division is essential for proper immune cell development and function. By using a chemical mutagenesis strategy in mice, we identified a pedigree that has a complete block in B cell development at the pre-B cell stage resulting from a deletion in the Fnip1 gene. Enforced expression of(More)
Hematopoietic protein-1 (Hem-1) is a hematopoietic cell specific member of the WAVE (Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome verprolin-homologous protein) complex, which regulates filamentous actin (F-actin) polymerization in many cell types including immune cells. However, the roles of Hem-1 and the WAVE complex in erythrocyte biology are not known. In this study, we(More)
Hem1 (Hematopoietic protein 1) is a hematopoietic cell-specific member of the Hem family of cytoplasmic adaptor proteins. Orthologues of Hem1 in Dictyostelium discoideum, Drosophila melanogaster, and Caenorhabditis elegans are essential for cytoskeletal reorganization, embryonic cell migration, and morphogenesis. However, the in vivo functions of mammalian(More)
Adverse drug event (ADE) has significant implications on patient safety and is recognized as a major cause of fatalities and hospital expenses. Although some medical systems today can help reduce the number of ADE occurrences, these primarily take into account clinical factors-even though recent studies show the significance of genetic profiles in ADE(More)
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