Henry S. Richardson

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Biobanks and archived data sets collecting samples and data have become crucial engines of genetic and genomic research. Unresolved, however, is what responsibilities biobanks should shoulder to manage incidental findings and individual research results of potential health, reproductive, or personal importance to individual contributors (using "biobank"(More)
Recent work on incidental findings, concentrating on the difficult problems posed by the ambiguous results often generated by high-tech medicine, has proceeded largely independently from recent work on medical researchers' ancillary-care obligations, the obligations that researchers have to deal with diseases or conditions besides the one(s) under study.(More)
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The notion that it is useful to specify norms progressively in order to resolve doubts about what to do, which I developed initially in a 1990 article, has been only partly assimilated by the bioethics literature. The thought is not just that it is helpful to work with relatively specific norms. It is more than that: specification can replace deductive(More)
Three principal factors affect the stringency of medical researchers' obligation to provide antiretroviral treatment to participants in non-HIV/AIDS studies that are conducted in developing countries: (1) the centrality of HIV/AIDS to the study design, (2) the extent of the researcher-participant interaction, and (3) the cost relative to the study budget. I(More)
Existing attempts to explain why secondary researchers might have any obligation to return findings to the contributors of genetic samples falter because of the lack of any direct interaction between the secondary researchers and the contributors. The partial-entrustment account of these obligations defended here circumvents this problem by explaining how a(More)