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In this article, we analyze myopathies with cores, for which an association to malignant hyperthermia (MH) has been suggested. We discuss the clinical features, the underlying genetic defects, subsequent effects on cellular calcium metabolism, and in vitro muscle responses to MH triggers. We describe in detail central core disease, multiminicore disease,(More)
OBJECTIVE Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is a classically unapparent pharmacogenetic disorder of the skeletal muscles triggered by inhalational anesthetics or depolarizing muscle relaxants. The disposition to MH is inherited in an autosomal-dominant manner and is primarily due to mutations in the gene for the ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1). The present study(More)
BACKGROUND Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is a rare pharmacogenetic disorder which is characterized by life-threatening metabolic crises during general anesthesia. Classical triggering substances are volatile anesthetics and succinylcholine (SCh). The molecular basis of MH is excessive release of Ca2+ in skeletal muscle principally by a mutated ryanodine(More)
CONTEXT Sleep deprivation is a common problem on intensive care units (ICUs) influencing not only cognition, but also cellular functions. An appropriate sleep-wake cycle should therefore be maintained to improve patients' outcome. Multiple disruptive factors on ICUs necessitate the administration of sedating and sleep-promoting drugs for patients who are(More)
BACKGROUND Cerebral vasospasm is one of the most serious complications after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The cerebral artery diameter is regulated by complex physiological mechanisms. Among them the regulation of intracellular calcium homeostasis seems to play a crucial role. Recent data suggest that ryanodine receptors (RYRs) are involved in regulating(More)
Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is a pharmacogenetic disorder with an autosomal dominant inheritance. During exposure to triggering agents as volatile anaesthetics, affected individuals may develop a potentially fatal hypermetabolic syndrome caused by excessive calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum in skeletal muscle. More than 60 MH associated(More)
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