Henrik Lindén

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The local field potential (LFP) reflects activity of many neurons in the vicinity of the recording electrode and is therefore useful for studying local network dynamics. Much of the nature of the LFP is, however, still unknown. There are, for instance, contradicting reports on the spatial extent of the region generating the LFP. Here, we use a detailed(More)
The local field potential (LFP) is among the most important experimental measures when probing neural population activity, but a proper understanding of the link between the underlying neural activity and the LFP signal is still missing. Here we investigate this link by mathematical modeling of contributions to the LFP from a single layer-5 pyramidal neuron(More)
Local field potentials (LFPs) are of growing importance in neurophysiological investigations. LFPs supplement action potential recordings by indexing activity relevant to EEG, magnetoencephalographic, and hemodynamic (fMRI) signals. Recent reports suggest that LFPs reflect activity within very small domains of several hundred micrometers. We examined this(More)
While oscillations of the local field potential (LFP) are commonly attributed to the synchronization of neuronal firing rate on the same time scale, their relationship to coincident spiking in the millisecond range is unknown. Here, we present experimental evidence to reconcile the notions of synchrony at the level of spiking and at the mesoscopic scale. We(More)
Despite its century-old use, the interpretation of local field potentials (LFPs), the low-frequency part of electrical signals recorded in the brain, is still debated. In cortex the LFP appears to mainly stem from transmembrane neuronal currents following synaptic input, and obvious questions regarding the 'locality' of the LFP are: What is the size of the(More)
Electrical extracellular recordings, i.e., recordings of the electrical potentials in the extracellular medium between cells, have been a main work-horse in electrophysiology for almost a century. The high-frequency part of the signal (≳500 Hz), i.e., the multi-unit activity (MUA), contains information about the firing of action potentials in surrounding(More)
Leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) network models are commonly used to study how the spiking dynamics of neural networks changes with stimuli, tasks or dynamic network states. However, neurophysiological studies in vivo often rather measure the mass activity of neuronal microcircuits with the local field potential (LFP). Given that LFPs are generated by(More)
Power laws, that is, power spectral densities (PSDs) exhibiting 1/f(α) behavior for large frequencies f, have been observed both in microscopic (neural membrane potentials and currents) and macroscopic (electroencephalography; EEG) recordings. While complex network behavior has been suggested to be at the root of this phenomenon, we here demonstrate a(More)
With rapidly advancing multi-electrode recording technology, the local field potential (LFP) has again become a popular measure of neuronal activity in both research and clinical applications. Proper understanding of the LFP requires detailed mathematical modeling incorporating the anatomical and electrophysiological features of neurons near the recording(More)
Joint extracellular recordings of cortical spiking activity and mesoscopic population signals, such as the local field potential (LFP), are becoming increasingly popular as a tool for measuring cortical activity. The LFP, the low-frequency part of extracellular potentials, is thought to mainly reflect dendritic transmembrane currents following synaptic(More)