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The local field potential (LFP) is among the most important experimental measures when probing neural population activity, but a proper understanding of the link between the underlying neural activity and the LFP signal is still missing. Here we investigate this link by mathematical modeling of contributions to the LFP from a single layer-5 pyramidal neuron(More)
The local field potential (LFP) reflects activity of many neurons in the vicinity of the recording electrode and is therefore useful for studying local network dynamics. Much of the nature of the LFP is, however, still unknown. There are, for instance, contradicting reports on the spatial extent of the region generating the LFP. Here, we use a detailed(More)
Local field potentials (LFPs) are of growing importance in neurophysiological investigations. LFPs supplement action potential recordings by indexing activity relevant to EEG, magnetoencephalographic, and hemodynamic (fMRI) signals. Recent reports suggest that LFPs reflect activity within very small domains of several hundred micrometers. We examined this(More)
Electrical extracellular recordings, i.e., recordings of the electrical potentials in the extracellular medium between cells, have been a main work-horse in electrophysiology for almost a century. The high-frequency part of the signal (≳500 Hz), i.e., the multi-unit activity (MUA), contains information about the firing of action potentials in surrounding(More)
Despite its century-old use, the interpretation of local field potentials (LFPs), the low-frequency part of electrical signals recorded in the brain, is still debated. In cortex the LFP appears to mainly stem from transmembrane neuronal currents following synaptic input, and obvious questions regarding the 'locality' of the LFP are: What is the size of the(More)
While oscillations of the local field potential (LFP) are commonly attributed to the synchronization of neuronal firing rate on the same time scale, their relationship to coincident spiking in the millisecond range is unknown. Here, we present experimental evidence to reconcile the notions of synchrony at the level of spiking and at the mesoscopic scale. We(More)
We present a detailed comparison of the behavioral and electrophysiological development of seizure activity in mice genetically depleted of synapsin I and synapsin II (SynDKO mice), based on combined video and surface EEG recordings. SynDKO mice develop handling-induced epileptic seizures at the age of 2months. The seizures show a very regular behavioral(More)
Leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) network models are commonly used to study how the spiking dynamics of neural networks changes with stimuli, tasks or dynamic network states. However, neurophysiological studies in vivo often rather measure the mass activity of neuronal microcircuits with the local field potential (LFP). Given that LFPs are generated by(More)
Extracellular recordings are a key tool to record the activity of neurons in vivo. Especially in the case of experiments with behaving animals, however, the tedious procedure of electrode placement can take a considerable amount of expensive and restricted experimental time. Furthermore, due to tissue drifts and other sources of variability in the recording(More)