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We report that visual stimulation produces an easily detectable (5-20%) transient increase in the intensity of water proton magnetic resonance signals in human primary visual cortex in gradient echo images at 4-T magnetic-field strength. The observed changes predominantly occur in areas containing gray matter and can be used to produce(More)
It recently has been demonstrated that magnetic resonance imaging can be used to map changes in brain hemodynamics produced by human mental operations. One method under development relies on blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast: a change in the signal strength of brain water protons produced by the paramagnetic effects of venous blood(More)
This article reviews the preliminary experiences and the results obtained on the human brain at 4 T at the University of Minnesota. Anatomical and functional images are presented. Contrary to initial expectations and the early results, it is possible to obtain high-resolution images of the human brain with exquisite T1 contrast, delineating structures(More)
A hemispheric asymmetry in the functional activation of the human motor cortex during contralateral (C) and ipsilateral (I) finger movements, especially in right-handed subjects, was documented with nuclear magnetic resonance imaging at high field strength (4 tesla). Whereas the right motor cortex was activated mostly during contralateral finger movements(More)
This article describes experimental studies performed to demonstrate the feasibility of BOLD fMRI using echo-planar imaging (EPI) at 7 T and to characterize the BOLD response in humans at this ultrahigh magnetic field. Visual stimulation studies were performed in normal subjects using high-resolution multishot EPI sequences. Changes in R(*)(2) arising from(More)
Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), RF field (B(1)), and RF power requirement for human head imaging were examined at 7T and 4T magnetic field strengths. The variation in B(1) magnitude was nearly twofold higher at 7T than at 4T ( approximately 42% compared to approximately 23%). The power required for a 90 degrees pulse in the center of the head at 7T was(More)
A multislice EPI sequence was used to obtain functional MR images of the entire rat brain with BOLD contrast at 11.7 T. Ten to 11 slices covering the rat brain, with an in-plane resolution of 300 microm, provided enough sensitivity to detect activation in brain regions known to be involved in the somatosensory pathway during stimulation of the forelimbs.(More)
1. We used conventional gradient echo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at high field strength (4 Tesla) to functionally image the right motor cortex in six normal human subjects during the performance of a sequence of self-paced thumb to digit oppositions with the left hand (contralateral task), the right hand (ipsilateral task), and both hands (bilateral(More)
Recent advances in high-field MRI have dramatically improved the visualization of human brain anatomy in vivo. Most notably, in cortical gray matter, strong contrast variations have been observed that appear to reflect the local laminar architecture. This contrast has been attributed to subtle variations in the magnetic properties of brain tissue, possibly(More)
Resting-state, low-frequency (<0.08 Hz) fluctuations of blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance signal have been shown to exhibit high correlation among functionally connected regions. However, correlations of cerebral blood flow (CBF) fluctuations during the resting state have not been extensively studied. The main challenges of using(More)