Helen Louise Reeves

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Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents the most common liver disease in Western countries and often progresses to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) leading ultimately to liver fibrosis and liver cancer. The occurrence of hepatocyte cell death-so far characterized as hepatocyte apoptosis-represents a fundamental step from benign steatosis(More)
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an increasingly common condition, strongly associated with the metabolic syndrome, that can lead to progressive hepatic fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatic failure. Subtle inter-patient genetic variation and environmental factors combine to determine variation in disease progression. A common non-synonymous(More)
BACKGROUND Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has a prevalence of over 20% in Western societies. Affected individuals are at risk of developing both cirrhosis and hepatocellular cancer (HCC). Presently there is no cost effective population based means of identifying cirrhotic individuals and even if there were, our ability to perform HCC surveillance(More)
BACKGROUND The incidence and mortality of hepatocellular cancer (HCC) complicating alcoholic and non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases (ALD and NAFLD) is rising in western societies. Despite knowing the at risk populations for HCC development, the lack of sensitive and specific means of surveillance hampers disease detection at curable stages. The most widely(More)
Aim. To examine interaction between history of cancer in first-degree relatives and tobacco smoking in index patients of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods. We carried out a case-control involving 113 patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma and 110 controls over a 12-month period at the Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. They were all administered a(More)
The extremely poor outcome from pancreas cancer is well known. However, its aetiology less well appreciated, and the molecular mechanisms underlying this are poorly understood. Tobacco usage is one of the strongest risk factors for this disease, and this is a completely avoidable hazard. In addition, there are well described hereditary diseases which(More)
Interest has increased in the potential role of circulating tumour cells in cancer management. Most cell-based studies have been designed to determine the number of circulating tumour cells in a given volume of blood. Ability to understand the biology of the cancer cells would increase the clinical potential. The purpose of this study was to develop and(More)
Background: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has a prevalence of over 20% in Western societies. Affected individuals are at risk of developing both cirrhosis and hepatocellular cancer (HCC). Presently there is no cost effective population based means of identifying cirrhotic individuals and even if there were, our ability to perform HCC(More)
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